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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF FUSARIUM VERTICILLIOIDES, FUMONISINS AND FUSARIUM DISEASES OF MAIZE

Location: Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens & Mycology Research Unit

Title: Biological and Chemical Complexity of Fusarium proliferatum

Authors
item Proctor, Robert
item Desjardins, Anne
item Moretti, Antonio - INST OF SCI OF FOOD PROD

Submitted to: Plant Pathology International Congress
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: November 10, 2008
Publication Date: January 15, 2010
Citation: Proctor, R., Desjardins, A.E., Moretti, A. 2010. Biological and Chemical Complexity of Fusarium proliferatum. In: Strange, R.N., Gullino, M.L., editors. The Role of Plant Pathology in Food Safety and Food Security, Plant Pathology in the 21st Century. Volume 3. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer Science & Business Media. p. 97-111.

Interpretive Summary: The purpose of this article is to review literature on the fungus Fusarium proliferatum. In the past, Fusarium proliferatum has been confused with morphologically similar species. Today, F. proliferatum is well defined by morphology, its sexual compatibility, and DNA sequence analyses. F. proliferatum has a worldwide distribution and is a pathogen on an unusually broad range of plant species. It is a frequent component of ear rot diseases of maize and wheat, and also causes diseases of plants as diverse as asparagus, fig, onion, palm, pine, and rice. DNA-based analyses have revealed a high level of genetic diversity within F. proliferatum but indicate that isolates of the fungus from one host species are no more closely related to one another than to isolates from other host species. F. proliferatum produces a wide range of biologically active metabolites, including the mycotoxins fumonisins. Its broad host range, ability to produce diverse metabolites, and its amenability to genetic and molecular genetic analyses make F. proliferatum an excellent system for biological and chemical studies. The information presented in this manuscript summarizes an increasing body of literature on F. proliferatum and should serve as a valuable reference for plant pathologists, plant breeders, and other scientists who work with the fungus.

Technical Abstract: In the past, the fungus Fusarium proliferatum has been confused with morphologically similar species. Today, F. proliferatum is well defined by morphology, its teleomorphic state (Gibberella intermedia), and DNA-based analyses. F. proliferatum has a worldwide distribution and an unusually broad host range. It is a frequent component of ear rot diseases of maize and wheat, and also causes diseases of plants as diverse as asparagus, fig, onion, palm, pine, and rice. DNA-based, phylogenetic analyses have revealed a high level of genetic diversity within F. proliferatum but have provided no evidence for significant species substructure based on host or geographic origin. F. proliferatum produces a wide range of biologically active metabolites, including the mycotoxins beauvericin, fumonisins, fusaproliferin, fusaric acid, fusarins, and moniliformin. Its broad host range, ability to produce diverse biologically active metabolites, and its amenability to meiotic and molecular genetic analyses make F. proliferatum an excellent system for biological and chemical studies on fungal ecology, fungal-plant interactions, and evolution.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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