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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Cotton Classing and Inspection in China

Author
item Cui, Xiaoliang

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 10, 2009
Publication Date: February 27, 2009
Citation: Cui, X. 2009. Cotton Classing and Inspection in China. Meeting Proceedings. Paper #5.

Interpretive Summary: Chinese market is important to U.S. cotton. China is the largest cotton producer, consumer and importer. China produced 35.8 million bales in 2007/08 crop year, India produced 21.8 million bales, and the U.S. produced 19.2 million bales. Comparing the production with consumption, China needs to import 17 million bales and the U.S. needs to export about two thirds of the cotton production. About 50% of the U.S. cotton export has been exported to China. One of the major advantages of the U.S. cotton over Chinese and Indian cottons is less contamination. Two Chinese government agencies are responsible for cotton testing. The China Fiber Inspection Bureau (CFIB) is responsible for domestic cotton classing and establishing standards. The China Inspection and Quarantine (CIQ) is responsible for inspection of imported cotton. USDA, National Cotton Council, Cotton Incorporated, and Cotton Council International have been closely working with CFIB and CIQ to promote cotton utilization and facilitate cotton export to China. The functions of the two agencies are introduced. The Chinese classing systems and the quality parameters are discussed. The challenges that the Chinese textile mill are facing briefly discussed in terms possible impact on the U.S. cotton export to China.

Technical Abstract: Chinese market is important to U.S. cotton. China is the largest cotton producer, consumer and importer. China produced 35.8 million bales in 2007/08 crop year, India produced 21.8 million bales, and the U.S. produced 19.2 million bales. Comparing the production with consumption, China needs to import 17 million bales and the U.S. needs to export about two thirds of the cotton production. About 50% of the U.S. cotton export has been exported to China. One of the major advantages of the U.S. cotton over Chinese and Indian cottons is less contamination. Two Chinese government agencies are responsible for cotton testing. The China Fiber Inspection Bureau (CFIB) is responsible for domestic cotton classing and establishing standards. The China Inspection and Quarantine (CIQ) is responsible for inspection of imported cotton. USDA, National Cotton Council, Cotton Incorporated, and Cotton Council International have been closely working with CFIB and CIQ to promote cotton utilization and facilitate cotton export to China. The functions of the two agencies are introduced. The Chinese classing systems and the quality parameters are discussed. The challenges that the Chinese textile mill are facing briefly discussed in terms possible impact on the U.S. cotton export to China.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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