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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: OBJECT MODELING AND SCALING OF LANDSCAPE PROCESSES AND CONSERVATION EFFECTS IN AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS Title: Development and application of a modular watershed-scale hydrologic model using the object modeling system: runoff response evaluation

Authors
item Ascough, James
item David, Olaf - COLORADO STATE UNIV.
item Krause, Peter - UNIVERSITY OF JENA
item Heathman, Gary
item Kralisch, Sven - UNIVERSITY OF JENA
item Larose, M -
item Ahuja, Lajpat
item Kipka, Holm -

Submitted to: Transactions of the ASABE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 5, 2012
Publication Date: March 15, 2012
Citation: Ascough II, J.C., David, O., Krause, P., Heathman, G.C., Kralisch, S., Larose, M., Ahuja, L.R., Kipka, H. 2012. Development and application of a modular watershed-scale hydrologic model using the object modeling system: runoff response evaluation. Transactions of the ASABE. 55(1):117-135.

Interpretive Summary: This study reports on: 1) the integration of the European J2K model (an object-oriented, modular hydrological system for fully distributed simulation of the water balance in large watersheds) under the Object Modeling System (OMS) environmental modeling framework; and 2) evaluation of OMS-J2K performance on the Cedar Creek Watershed (CCW) in northeastern Indiana. Model performance for daily, monthly, and annual stream flow response using both parameter sets was assessed using the following model evaluation coefficients: Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency (ENS), coefficient of determination (R2), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), ratio of RMSE to the standard deviation of measured data (RSR), and percent bias (PBIAS). Comparisons of daily, average monthly, and annual average simulated and observed flows for the 1997-2005 simulation period using two input parameter sets resulted in relative error (PBIAS), RMSE, and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (ENS) coefficients ranging from 9-20% for PBIAS, 1.02-8.23 m3 s-1 for RMSE, and 0.47-0.65 for ENS. The range of relative error (e.g., PBIAS) and ENS values for uncalibrated stream flow predictions in this study were similar or better than others reported in the literature. The study is unique in that it represents the first attempt to develop and apply a complex natural resource system model under the OMS.

Technical Abstract: This study reports on: 1) the integration of the European J2K model (an object-oriented, modular hydrological system for fully distributed simulation of the water balance in large watersheds) under the Object Modeling System (OMS) environmental modeling framework; and 2) evaluation of OMS-J2K performance on the Cedar Creek Watershed (CCW) in northeastern Indiana. Two input parameter sets were developed for OMS-J2K evaluation: 1) a “base parameter set” with parameter values taken from previous simulation studies where J2K was applied to watersheds with characteristics similar to the CCW; and 2) an “adjusted parameter set” with modifications to input parameters related to evapotranspiration, soil water storage, and soil water lateral flow. Model performance for daily, monthly, and annual stream flow response using both parameter sets was assessed using the following model evaluation coefficients: Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency (ENS), coefficient of determination (R2), Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), ratio of RMSE to the standard deviation of measured data (RSR), and percent bias (PBIAS). Comparisons of daily, average monthly, and annual average simulated and observed flows for the 1997-2005 simulation period using the base parameter set resulted in relative error (PBIAS), RMSE, and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (ENS) coefficients ranging from 16-20% for PBIAS, 1.98-8.23 m3 s-1 for RMSE, and 0.47-0.55 for ENS. All statistical evaluation coefficients for daily, average monthly, and average annual stream flow improved substantially for the adjusted parameter set (e.g., PBIAS, RMSE, and ENS coefficients ranged from 9-10% for PBIAS, 1.02-6.06 m3 s-1 for RMSE, and 0.62-0.65 for ENS). The range of relative error (e.g., PBIAS) and ENS values for uncalibrated stream flow predictions in this study were similar (base parameter set) or better (adjusted parameter set) than others reported in the literature. The study is unique in that it represents the first attempt to develop and apply a complex natural resource system model under the OMS. In addition, this study represents first time that J2K hydrological process components have been evaluated on a watershed in the United States.

Last Modified: 11/21/2014