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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: AIR QUALITY IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY REGION AS INFLUENCED BY AGRICULTURAL LAND USE CHANGES Title: Emerging contaminants and their potential effects on amphibians and reptiles

Authors
item Mcconnell, Laura
item Sparling, Donald - ILLINOIS STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: June 29, 2009
Publication Date: June 2, 2010
Repository URL: http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/dspace/handle/10113/45860
Citation: Mcconnell, L.L., Sparling, D.W. 2010. Emerging Contaminants and Their Potential Effects on Amphibians. In: Sparling, D.W., Linder, G., Bishop,C.A., Krest, S.K., editors. Exotoxicology of Amphibians and Reptiles. 2nd edition. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. p.487-510.

Interpretive Summary: Serious threats to the health and sustainability of global amphibian populations have been well documented over the last few decades. Encroachment upon and destruction of primary habitat is the most critical threat, but some species have disappeared while their habitat remains. Additional stressors include increased ultraviolet-B radiation, fungal diseases (chytrid), parasites, climate change, introduction of exotic species and pollution. Effects from pollutant exposure on wild populations are often the most difficult threat to discern due to multiple stressors which may be playing a role within any one location or annual cycle. The overall number of laboratory ecotoxicological studies carried out on amphibian and related species are small relative to other aquatic organisms. Over the last five to six years, a number of compound classes have been identified as “emerging contaminants”. As the capacity and technological capability of analytical chemistry have improved, development of methods to measure organic chemicals of varying properties in environmental matrices has become more rapid. The purpose of this study is to evaluate available data on the sources, environmental fate and potential exposure and toxicity to amphibians from a number of emerging compound classes.

Technical Abstract: Serious threats to the health and sustainability of global amphibian populations have been well documented over the last few decades. Encroachment upon and destruction of primary habitat is the most critical threat, but some species have disappeared while their habitat remains. Additional stressors include increased ultraviolet-B radiation, fungal diseases (chytrid), parasites, climate change, introduction of exotic species and pollution. Effects from pollutant exposure on wild populations are often the most difficult threat to discern due to multiple stressors which may be playing a role within any one location or annual cycle. The overall number of laboratory ecotoxicological studies carried out on amphibian and related species are small relative to other aquatic organisms. Over the last five to six years, a number of compound classes have been identified as “emerging contaminants”. As the capacity and technological capability of analytical chemistry have improved, development of methods to measure organic chemicals of varying properties in environmental matrices has become more rapid. The purpose of this study is to evaluate available data on the sources, environmental fate and potential exposure and toxicity to amphibians from a number of emerging compound classes.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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