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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED CEREAL APHID MANAGMENT

Location: Wheat, Peanut and Other Field Crops Research

Title: Relative attractiveness of colour traps to pear psylla in relation to seasonal changes in pear phenology

Authors
item COOPER, WILLIAM
item PUTERKA, GARY
item GLENN, D. MICHAEL

Submitted to: The Canadian Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 27, 2009
Publication Date: March 15, 2010
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/41730
Citation: Cooper, W.R., Puterka, G.J., Glenn, D.M. 2010. Relative attractiveness of colour traps to pear psylla in relation to seasonal changes in pear phenology. The Canadian Entomologist. 142(2):188-191.

Interpretive Summary: Pear psylla is a significant pest in pear orchards. Yellow traps are commonly used to monitor psylla populations during summer months, but are not effective during winter months when pear psylla populations are low. This study presents temporal color trap preference of pear psylla over a 24 month duration. Black, blue, brown, clear, green, orange, red, white, and yellow traps were assayed against wild psylla populations. While pear psylla had a strong preference for yellow and orange during summer months, psylla showed a slight preference for red traps during winter months and no preference in the early spring. These results could lead to the development of effective winter monitoring tools for pear psylla to predict subsequent spring outbreaks.

Technical Abstract: This study presents temporal color trap preference of pear psylla (Cacopsylla pyricola Foerster, Hemiptera: Psyllidae) over a 24 month duration. Black, blue, brown, clear, green, orange, red, white, and yellow traps were assayed against wild psylla populations. While pear psylla had a strong preference for yellow and orange during summer months, psylla showed a slight preference for red traps during winter months and no preference in the early spring. The implications of these results regarding monitoring tools and the use of particle film technology for pest management are discussed.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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