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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Midgut gene expression in Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) Diaphorina citri

Authors
item Hunter, Wayne
item Hall, David

Submitted to: National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: July 7, 2008
Publication Date: July 7, 2008
Citation: Hunter, W.B., Hall, D.G. 2008. Midgut gene expression in Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) Diaphorina citri. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). USDA-FP 190004-FK254041- FK260232. Available: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/viewer.fcgi?db=nucest&val=193296936.

Interpretive Summary: The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, is an invasive insect which spreads bacterial diseases of citrus known as huanglongbing or citrus greening disease. The psyllid has spread across the southern United States from Florida to California and occurs throughout citrus growing regions of Mexico. A new understanding of the digestive enzymes produced by this psyllid was obtained using a genomics approach to examine the genes present in the psyllids midgut and enzymes they produce. The information might be useful in the development of new management tools to reduce or stop psyllid transmission of huanglongbing. The genetic information established molecular makers, pieces of the psyllids DNA code, that can be used like a fingerprint to identify the insect. Predatory insects that feed on the psyllid can now be tested using these genetic markers to verify they consume the psyllid and to quantify numbers of predators attacking the psyllid.

Technical Abstract: We produced a gene expression dataset from the midgut tissues of the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP is the primary vector of the bacterium associated with a devastating citrus disease known as huanglongbing (HLB). The occurrence and spread of the AsCP and HLB within the U.S. from Florida to Louisiana and of the AsCP into Texas and California has cause for much concern. Currently growers faced with HLB use intensive insecticide control programs, which is disruptive to non-target organisms and the environment. These insecticide programs are expensive and interfere with normal biological control agents. We are using a genomics approach to identify key genes within AsCP for the development of RNAi strategies to reduce/kill AsCP to reduce HLB spread. Many of the digestive enzymes have homology across insect species, but there is enough genetic variation which supports the development of designed specific RNAi strategies against a specific set of insects like AsCP. Psyllids are only now being examined in this manner. A dataset of 6,200 genetic sequences was successfully isolated and characterized from adult Asian citrus psyllids. The newly created dataset was published under accession numbers: FK254041-FK260232, in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, NCBI, nr public database. These sequences may permit the development of new management tools to reduce or stop psyllid transmission of huanglongbing which are more environmentally friendly and less costly than insecticides. These data also provide molecular makers, pieces of the psyllids DNA code that can be used like a fingerprint as diagnostic tools.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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