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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPING TOOLS TO ENHANCE WATER QUALITY FROM AGRICULTURAL ENTERPRISES IN SOUTH FLORIDA

Location: Subtropical Horticulture Research

Title: Influence of Composting on Leaching of Phosphorus in a Calcareous Soil

Authors
item Shinde, D - UNIV OF FLA, GANSVL FL
item Savabi, M
item Konomi, K - FIU, MIAMI, FL
item Nkedi-Kizza, P - UNIV OF FLA, GANSVL FL
item REED, STEWART
item Jayachandran, K - FIU, MIAMI, FL

Submitted to: International Agricultural Engineering Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 22, 2009
Publication Date: December 30, 2009
Citation: Shinde, D., Savabi, M.R., Konomi, K., Nkedi-Kizza, P., Reed, S.T., Jayachandran, K. 2009. Influence of Composting on Leaching of Phosphorus in a Calcareous Soil. International Agricultural Engineering Journal. 18(3-4):35-41.

Interpretive Summary: The agricultural area of South Miami-Dade County, Florida, is bounded by urban development to the north, Biscayne Bay and Biscayne National Park to the east, Everglades National Park (ENP) to the west, and Florida Bay to the south. Agriculture production brings an approximate economic value worth $538 million annually to Miami-Dade County. Over 23,000 people are directly involved in the county’s highly efficient agriculture. The climate is maritime subtropical with a yearly mean temperature of 23 °C and annual rainfall of 165 cm. Mean annual relative humidity is about 62%. The warm climate, high humidity, and ample rainfall are appropriate for the production of tropical and subtropical fruits year around and traditional vegetable crops for eight months of the year. About 85% of precipitation occurs from June to September. Soils in the region are gravely and do not hold water and nutrients to support a desirable crop growth. The retention and movement of phosphorus (P) was investigated in a calcareous soil (Krome) amended with three types of composts. This study shows that adding 134 t ha-1 5 of BDM compost to the calcareous soil increased soil water holding capacity, reduced water movement, and had least leaching potential for P.

Technical Abstract: The agricultural area of South Miami-Dade County, Florida, is bounded by Urban development to the north, Biscayne Bay and Biscayne National Park to the east, Everglades National Park (ENP) to the west, and Florida Bay to the South. Composting to improve soil water retention is is a common practice in the region. A column study was conducted to study the retention of agro-chemical in soils with and without compost. About 93% of the applied P to the other treatments was leached from control with no application of P showing a high presence of soluble native P. The sorption study suggested that BDM retained most of the applied P. This study shows that adding 134 t ha-1 5 of BDM compost to the calcareous soil increased soil water holding capacity, reduced water movement, and had least leaching potential for P.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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