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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Strategic Use of Naturally Selenium (Se)-rich Milling Coproducts to Eliminate Se Deficiency and Create Se-enriched Foods.

Author
item Taylor, Joshua

Submitted to: Animal Production World Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 13, 2008
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Selenium (Se) is essential for sustaining a healthy life. When dietary Se was marginally deficient, populations experienced impaired reproduction and growth rates and increased disease rates. Selenium-rich grains, harvested from regions with seleniferous soils, are natural sources of bioavailable Se. Based on our research, Se-enriched feeds can be prepared from high-Se grains that were harvested from regions with seleniferous soils. These feeds were strategically and safely used to eliminate the risk of Se deficiency in livestock while simultaneously creating Se-rich food products, such as meat and milk, for human consumption.

Technical Abstract: Selenium (Se) is essential for sustaining a healthy life. When dietary Se was marginally deficient, populations experienced impaired reproduction and growth rates and increased disease rates. Selenium-rich grains, harvested from regions with seleniferous soils, were natural sources of bioavailable Se. These grains contained 3 to 20 times as much Se as grains grown in soils with adequate Se availability. We isolated a specific wheat-milling coproduct that had 37% greater Se content than the parent grain. Through strategic feeding of Se-enriched coproducts, we enhanced the Se status of livestock. Muscle foods harvested from lambs fattened on Se-enriched coproducts for 14 days provided more than 70% of the daily Se requirement for humans. Milk collected from ewes fed Se-enriched coproducts during the first 28 days of lactation had 7 times as much Se as milk from ewes fed sodium selenite. Because of the degree of Se enrichment achieved, these ewes and their nursing young grazed range without the need for supplemental Se for almost 1 year. Ultimately, we used a naturally occurring Se-rich feed source to add nutritional value to food-animal products and enhance the long-term Se status of livestock. Based on our research, Se-enriched feeds can be prepared from high-Se grains that were harvested from regions with seleniferous soils. Furthermore, these feeds can be strategically and safely used to eliminate the risk of Se deficiency in livestock while simultaneously creating Se-rich food products, such as meat and milk, for human consumption.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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