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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Metabolic Syndrome in Yup'ik Eskimos: The Center for Alaska Native Health Research (CANHR) Study

Authors
item Boyer, Bert - UNIV. ALASKA HEALTH RES.
item Mohatt, Gerald - UNIV. ALASKA HEALTH RES.
item Plaetke, Rosemarie - UNIV. ALASKA HEALTH RES.
item Herron, Johanna - UNIV. ALASKA HEALTH RES.
item Stanhope, Kimber - UC DAVIS, NUTR. DEPT.
item Stephensen, Charles
item Havel, Peter - UC DAVIS, NUTR. DEPT.

Submitted to: Obesity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 2007
Publication Date: November 1, 2007
Citation: Boyer, B.B., Mohatt, G.V., Plaetke, R., Herron, J., Stanhope, K.L., Stephensen, C.B., Havel, P.J. 2007. Metabolic Syndrome in Yup'ik Eskimos: The Center for Alaska Native Health Research (CANHR) Study. Obesity. Vol.15 No.11, 2535-2540.

Interpretive Summary: Metabolic syndrome is defined by elevated body weight, waist circumference, increased blood pressure, and abnormal serum lipid and glucose levels. The prevalence of these risk factors can vary among different population groups. Metabolic syndrome has been relatively uncommon in Yup’ik Eskimos, perhaps due to dietary and lifestyle differences. However, this study indicates a trend toward a less healthy risk profile and further increases in metabolic syndrome risk factors among Yup’ik Eskimos could lead to increases in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, once rare in this population.

Technical Abstract: Objective: This study investigated the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its defining components among Yup’ik Eskimos. Research Methods and Procedures: A cross-sectional study design that included 710 adult Yup’ik Eskimos 18 years of age residing in 8 communities in Southwest Alaska. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was determined using the recently updated Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in this study cohort was 14.7%, and varied by sex with 8.6% of the men and 19.8% of the women having metabolic syndrome. This is lower than the prevalence of 23.9% in the general U.S. adult population. The most common metabolic syndrome components/risk factors were increased waist circumference and elevated blood glucose. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels in Yup’ik Eskimos were significantly higher, and triglycerides lower than levels reported in National Health and Nutritional Examination III. Discussion: Compared with other populations, metabolic syndrome is relatively uncommon in Yup’ik Eskimos. The higher prevalence among Yup’ik women is primarily explained by their large waist circumference, suggesting central body fat accumulation. Further increases in metabolic syndrome risk factors among Yup’ik Eskimos could lead to increases in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, once rare in this population.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014