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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of Hydrothermal Treatment on the Physicochemical, Rheological, and Oil-Resistant Properties of Rice Flour

Authors
item Kim, Deok Nyun -
item Bae, In Young -
item Inglett, George
item Lee, Suyong -

Submitted to: Journal of Texture Studies
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 26, 2008
Publication Date: March 30, 2009
Citation: Kim, D., Bae, I., Inglett, G.E., Lee, S. 2009. Effect of Hydrothermal Treatment on the Physicochemical, Rheological, and Oil-Resistant Properties of Rice Flour. Journal of Texture Studies. 40(2):192-207.

Interpretive Summary: With the current interests on healthy foods, the importance of low fat frying batters is a growing area for using health-enhancing materials such as rice flour modified by steam jet-cooking. Its performance in frying batters as an oil barrier compared to native rice flour led to a dramatic reduction of oil uptake by around 40%. The use of steam jet-cooked rice flour also enabled the fried batters to control the moisture loss effectively. These results should result in increased use of rice flour for adding health benefits to food.

Technical Abstract: Rice flour was thermo-mechanically modified by steam jet-cooking and the physico-chemical and rheological properties of the resulting product were characterized. Then, its performance in frying batters was evaluated as an oil barrier. Compared to native rice flour, the steam jet-cooked rice flour exhibited significantly increased hydration properties and its pasting properties were characterized by cold initial viscosity, decreased set back, and the lack of peak viscosity. The steam jet-cooked rice flour exhibited shear-thinning behaviors, which were satisfactorily fitted into the Carreau equation. In addition, dynamic viscoelastic measurements showed that the liquid-like nature was more dominant over the solid-like properties, implying the similar viscoelastic response to diluted solutions. When incorporated into frying batter formulations, the steam jet-cooked rice flour increased the batter viscosity and pickup. The use of steam jet-cooked rice flour also enabled the fried batters to control the moisture loss effectively. Furthermore, the wheat flour replacement with 40% steam jet-cooked rice flour in batters led to dramatic reduction of oil uptake by around 40%.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014