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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MINIMIZING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF LIVESTOCK MANURES USING INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT REGIMENS

Location: Renewable Energy and Manure Management Research

Title: Effects of enzyme additions to diets with corn- and sorghum-based distiller's dried grains with solubles on growth performance and nutrient digestibility in nursery and finishing pigs

Authors
item Feoli, Carolina - KANSAS STATE UNIV
item Hancock, Joe - KANSAS STATE UNIV
item Gugle, Terry - KANSAS STATE UNIV
item Carter, Scott - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV
item Cole, Noel

Submitted to: American Society of Animal Science
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 9, 2008
Publication Date: July 11, 2008
Citation: Feoli, C., Hancock, J., Gugle, T., Carter, S., Cole, N.A. 2008. Effects of enzyme additions to diets with corn- and sorghum-based distiller's dried grains with solubles on growth performance and nutrient digestibility in nursery and finishing pigs [abstract]. Abstracts of American Dairy Science Association and American Society of Animal Science Joint Meeting, July 7-11, 2008, Indianapolis, Indiana. No. 693. 2008 CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of enzyme additions on the nutritional value of diets with corn- and sorghum-based distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS). For Exp. 1, 180 weaning pigs were fed the same starter diet for 10 d and then used in a 27-d growth assay. There were six pigs/pen and six pens/treatment with an average initial BW of 7.5 kg. Treatments were a corn-soy-based control and diets with 30% corn-based (Hudson, SD) and sorghum-based DDGS (Russell, KS) without and with enzymes (cocktail of beta-glucanase, xylanase, alpha-amylase, and pectinase to supply 150, 4000, 1000, and 25 units of activity, respectively, per kg of diet). Pigs fed the control diet had greater ADG and digestibility of DM, N, and GE (P < 0.003) than pigs fed the DDGS treatments. Addition of enzymes improved ADG and decreased ADFI for pigs fed corn-based DDGS (DDGS source x enzyme interaction, P < 0.08). However, addition of enzymes improved G:F (P < 0.08) and digestibility of DM (P < 0.04) regardless of DDGS source. For Exp. 2, 330 finishing pigs (avg BW of 64 kg) were used in a 65-d growth assay. There were 11 pigs/pen and six pens/treatment. Treatments were the same as in Exp. 1, but 40% DDGS were used for the finishing experiment. Pigs fed the control diet had greater ADG and ADFI and digestibility of DM, N, and GE (P < 0.008) than pigs fed the DDGS treatments. Pigs fed the corn-based DDGS treatments had greater G:F, digestibility of DM, N, and GE, and iodine value of jowl fat than pigs fed the sorghum-based DDGS treatments (P < 0.04). Enzymes improved digestibility of DM, N, and GE (P < 0.007), especially for diets with sorghum-based DDGS (DDGS source x enzyme interaction, P < 0.10). In conclusion, rate of gain and nutrient digestibility were decreased with addition of DDGS to diets for nursery and finishing pigs, but adding enzymes partially restored those losses.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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