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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCING SOYBEAN YIELD LOSSES THROUGH GENETIC IMPROVEMENT

Location: Crop Genetics Research Unit

Title: Ligninolytic Activity of Fusarium virguliforme (SYN. F. solani f. sp. glycines), the Causal Agent of Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome

Authors
item Lygin, Anatoliy - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Li, Shuxian
item Zernova, Olga - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Hartman, Glen
item Widholm, Jack - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Lozovaya, Vera - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: International Fusarium Workshop
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 21, 2007
Publication Date: August 30, 2008
Citation: Lygin, A., Li, S., Zernova, O., Hartman, G.L., Widholm, J., Lozovaya, V. 2008. Ligninolytic Activity of Fusarium virguliforme (SYN. F. solani f. sp. glycines), the Causal Agent of Soybean Sudden Death Syndrome. International Fusarium Workshop. 0:10

Technical Abstract: Fusarium virguliforme (syn. F. solani f. sp. glycines), a soil-borne fungus, is the causal agent of soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS), one of the most important diseases of soybean. Lignin degradation is not common in most soilborne fungi which are considered to be cellulose degraders only. In this study, ligninolytic activity of F. virguliforme was analyzed by the catalyzed release of 14CO2 from purified 14C-labeled Klason lignin, the degradation of polymeric aromatic dyes in culture (a method commonly used to test the ligninolytic capacity of microorganisms), and the production of the major fungal lignin degrading enzymes, laccase and lignin peroxidase. Results showed that the laccase and lignin peroxidase activities and levels of decolorization of aromatic polymeric dyes (Poly R-478 and Remazol Brilliant Blue R) by F. virguliforme were intermediate or even greater than that found in our tests with two known lignin-degrading fungi, Polyporus tulipifera and Schizophyllum commune. The ligninolytic activity of F. virguliforme may play an important role in infection, colonization, and survival of the fungus. Enhancing the lignin level and also decreasing lignin degradability in soybean roots via genetic engineering may help to reduce root infection and thus combat F. virguliforme infection.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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