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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Assesing potential effects of inulin and probiotic bacteria on Fe bioavailability from common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Caco-2 cells

Authors
item Laparra, Jose Moises - CORNELL UNIVERSITY
item Glahn, Raymond
item Miller, Dennis D. - CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2008
Publication Date: March 1, 2009
Citation: Laparra, J., Glahn, R.P., Miller, D. 2009. Assesing potential effects of inulin and probiotic bacteria on Fe bioavailability from common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Caco-2 cells. Journal of Food Science. 74(2):H40-46.

Interpretive Summary: A model for digestion has been developed in our lab that uses a simulated digestion and Caco-2 epithelial tissue cell culture monolayer to imitate the intestinal lining and absorption of minerals into our bodies. This study was to see if a prebiotic (inulin) and two probiotic bacteria could affect Fe uptake from white and red beans using the Caco-2 cells as an intestinal epithial model. The results suggest that probiotics could increase Fe uptake from common beans.

Technical Abstract: Inulin, a prebiotic, may enhance intestinal Fe absorption. Our objective was to assess the effects of supplemental inulin and two probiotic bacteria (B. infantis and L.acidophillus) on Fe availability to Caco-2 cells from common white and red beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Cooked beans were mixed or not with supplemental inulin (4%, w/w), and then subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion (pepsin, pH 2; pancreatin, pH 7.2). Subsequently, the digests were incubated overnight with and without B.infantis or L. acidophilus. Ferritin formation in Caco-2 cells was used to evaluate Fe uptake. Total soluble phenols (Folin-ciocalteau) and phytate (HPLC-electrochemical detection) were quantified, and the flavonoids profile (HPLC-PDA/UV detection) was monitored in the digests. Supplemental inulin did not affect Fe uptake from white nor red beans. Incubation with B. infantis increased total soluble phenols (TSP) in the digests and decreased Fe uptake, besides, incubation with L.acidophillus decreased TSP in the digest and increased Fe uptake. Variations in Fe uptake were not associated with soluble phytate concentrations in the digests. The largest differences in flavonoids profile were found in the digests incubated with L. acidophilus, which decreased the solubilized content of astragalin (kaempferol-3-O-glucoside). These results suggest that probiotics could increase Fe uptake from common beans.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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