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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Resistant starch and dietary fibers from cereal by-products

Author
item Inglett, George

Submitted to: UJNR Food & Agricultural Panel Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 24, 2009
Publication Date: February 4, 2009
Citation: Inglett, G.E. 2009. Resistant starch and dietary fibers from cereal by-products. UJNR Food & Agricultural Panel Proceedings.

Interpretive Summary: With the current interests on healthy foods, the importance of dietary fibers is growing rapidly as health-enhancing materials. These fibers are found abundantly in cereal by-products. New materials were recently developed containing 20% and 30% soluble fiber from oats. They are now widely used in the food industry for improving nutrition. A fiber gel was prepared from corn hulls that is also a widely used material in the food industry. Resistant starch is a form of dietary fiber that was found in distillers dried grains in small quantities. Therefore, there is only a small potential for utilization.

Technical Abstract: Dried distillers grains (DDG) are a cereal byproduct from ethanol distillation process. On a dry weight basis, DDG is composed of 13% fat, 30% protein, 33% fiber, with the remainder various carbohydrates. Only 6-8% of starch in DDG is in resistant form (dietary fiber). Because only about 6% of DDG is starch, there is no potential to extract resistant starch as a dietary fiber food ingredient. With the current interests on healthy foods, the importance of dietary fibers is growing rapidly as health-enhancing materials. These fibers are found abundantly in cereal products. A cellulosic gel was prepared from corn hulls and is now commercially available from Z-Trim Holding Company. The soluble fiber, beta-glucan found in oats and barley, has received much attention due to its beneficial health effects such as the reduction of cholesterol and blood pressure. Moreover, the fiber is allowed by the FDA to make health claims for oat products when 0.75g beta-glucan is consumed in a serving portion. Recently developed are new oat hydrocolloids containing 20% and 30% beta-glucan (called C-trim20 and C-trim30, respectively) were obtained from oats and their baking performance evaluated. They are now available from VDF FutureCeuticals and widely used in the food industry for improving nutrition as well as by controlling the texture and rheology of food products.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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