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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SORTING AGRICULTURAL MATERIALS FOR DEFECTS USING IMAGING AND PHYSICAL METHODS

Location: Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention

Title: Distribution of Aflatoxin in Non-Irrigated Peanuts

Authors
item Toyofuku, Natsuko
item Schatzki, Thomas
item Ong, Martin - FORMERLY USDA

Submitted to: World Mycotoxin Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 7, 2008
Publication Date: February 1, 2009
Citation: Toyofuku, N., Schatzki, T.F., Ong, M.S. 2009. Distribution of Aflatoxin in Non-Irrigated Peanuts. World Mycotoxin Journal. 2(1):71-75.

Interpretive Summary: The B1 and total aflatoxin distribution in Georgia Greens peanuts has been measured. Sample distributions were measured in approximately 400 small samples each of Jumbo, Medium and small Oil Stock (OS) sublots, containing 20, 10, and 5 kernels, respectively. Results were converted to single kernel probability density (SKD) distributions, p(c), using methods previously published as the “sparse approximation” (J. Agr. Food Chem. 1995 43 1561-1565). A surprising similarity to p(c) in tree nuts is noted. All three peanut sublots show evidence in the SKD of peaks at c =~25000 ng/g, ~300 ng/g and a peak at low c =~10 ng/g . The first and last of these are similar to peaks seen in tree nuts (the last often only in part). A rapid drop-off of p(c) is also observed above c = 100,000-500,000 ng/g, a value somewhat lower than that in tree nuts.

Technical Abstract: The B1 and total aflatoxin distribution in Georgia Greens peanuts has been measured. Sample distributions were measured in approximately 400 small samples each of Jumbo, Medium and small Oil Stock (OS) sublots, containing 20, 10, and 5 kernels, respectively. Results were converted to single kernel probability density (SKD) distributions, p(c), using methods previously published as the “sparse approximation” (J. Agr. Food Chem. 1995 43 1561-1565). A surprising similarity to p(c) in tree nuts is noted. All three peanut sublots show evidence in the SKD of peaks at c =~25000 ng/g, ~300 ng/g and a peak at low c =~10 ng/g . The first and last of these are similar to peaks seen in tree nuts (the last often only in part). A rapid drop-off of p(c) is also observed above c = 100,000-500,000 ng/g, a value somewhat lower than that in tree nuts.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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