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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USING REMOTE SENSING & MODELING FOR EVALUATING HYDROLOGIC FLUXES, STATES, & CONSTITUENT TRANSPORT PROCESSES WITHIN AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPES Title: Evaluation of Ku-Band Sensitivity To Soil Moisture: Soil Moisture Change Detection Over the NAFE06 Study Area

Authors
item Mladenova, L - UNIV SOUTH CAROLINA
item Lakshmi, V - UNIV SOUTH CAROLINA
item Jackson, Thomas
item Walker, J - UNIV MELBOURNE

Submitted to: International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 5, 2008
Publication Date: December 22, 2008
Citation: Mladenova, L., Lakshmi, V., Jackson, T.J., Walker, J. 2008. Evaluation of Ku-Band sensitivity to soil moisture: Soil moisture change detection over the NAPE06 study area. In: Proceedings of the International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, July 7-11, 2008, Boston, Massachussetts. p. I805-I808.

Technical Abstract: A very promising technique for spatial disaggregation of soil moisture is on the combination of radiometer and radar observations. Despite their demonstrated potential for long term large scale monitoring of soil moisture, passive and active have their disadvantages in terms of temporal and spatial resolution. The enhanced QuikSCAT sigma-0 product (2.225 km) offers a possibility for overcoming the temporal and spatial limitations of the available radar systems. Its sensitivity to soil moisture was explored over the National Airborne Field Experiment (NAFE'06) area located in the Murrumbidgee catchment, SE Australia. Validation was assessed using an airborne soil moisture product derived using the Polarimetric L-band Multibeam Radiometer (PLMR). The campaign was conducted over three study sites (Yanco, Kyeamba and Yenda) encompassing different vegetation regimes; however based on the available number of aircraft images only the Yanco area is considered. The research reveals expected temporal variability and adequately responds to change in meteorological conditions. The presence of irrigation and standing water (rice fields) in the domain challenges the spatial agreement throughout the study area.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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