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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USING REMOTE SENSING & MODELING FOR EVALUATING HYDROLOGIC FLUXES, STATES, & CONSTITUENT TRANSPORT PROCESSES WITHIN AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPES Title: Combined Passive Active Soil Moisture Observations During CLASIC

Authors
item Bindlish, R - SSAI
item Jackson, Thomas
item Yuch, S - NASA JPL
item Dinardo, S - NASA JPL
item Cosh, Michael
item Sun, R - BEIJING NORMAL UNIV

Submitted to: International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 5, 2008
Publication Date: December 22, 2008
Citation: Bindlish, R., Jackson, T.J., Yuch, S., Dinardo, S., Cosh, M.H., Sun, R. 2008. Combined passive active soil moisture observations during CLASIC. In: Proceedings of the International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, July 7-11, 2008, Boston, Massachusetts. p. II237-II244.

Technical Abstract: An important issue in advancing higher spatial resolution and better accuracy in soil moisture remote sensing is the integration of active and passive observations. In an effort to address these questions an airborne passive/active L-band system (PALS) was flown as part of CLASIC in Oklahoma over the Little Washita (rangeland and winter wheat) and Fort Cobb watersheds (irrigated agriculture and winter wheat). A total of 11 flight days were flown during the field campaign over each watershed. Extensive ground observations (soil moisture, soil temperature, vegetation) were made concurrent with the PALS observations. These flights were complemented by the acquisition of ALOS PALSAR data. Inter-comparison of radar observations indicated comparative calibration and possibly linear scaling. Extremely wet conditions were encountered during the field experiment. Initial results show the potential of combining passive and active PALS observations. Over the sampling sites PALS radiometer estimated soil moisture was in closer agreement over the Fort Cobb (SEE=0.048 m3/m3) than over the Little Washita watershed (SEE=0.067 m3/m3).

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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