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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Relative Reliability and Validity of the Block Kids Questionnaire among Youth Aged 10 to 17 Years

Authors
item Cullen, Karen
item Watson, Kathleen - BAYLOR COLLEGE MED
item Zakeri, Issa

Submitted to: Journal Of The American Dietetic Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2007
Publication Date: May 1, 2008
Citation: Cullen, K., Watson, K., Zakeri, I. 2008. Relative reliability and validity of the Block Kids Questionnaire among youth aged 10 to 17 years. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 108(5):862-866.

Interpretive Summary: This cross-sectional study tested whether the Block Kids Questionnaire (BKQ) was a valid method to assess children's diet over the past 7 days. Within a 7-day period, a dietitian interviewed 10- to 17-year-old children and adolescents by telephone to obtain the foods and amounts they ate on two different days (24-hour dietary recalls). At the end of the week, they completed the BKQ. Various statistical tests were used to assess the reliability and validity of the BKQ compared to the 24-hour dietary recalls for the whole group and by age group. Significant differences in nutrient and food group intakes were noted between the two dietary assessment methods, with the recalls having higher values than the BKQ. Overall, the children >12 years of age had better comparisons than those <12 years. These results suggest that the BKQ has validity for some nutrients, but not most food groups assessed, and appears more useful for adolescents.

Technical Abstract: This cross-sectional study tested the reliability and validity of the Block Kids Questionnaire to assess diet during the past 7 days. Within a 7-day period, 10- to 17-year-old children and adolescents completed two 24-hour dietary recalls by telephone, followed by the Block Kids Questionnaire at the end of the week. Test–retest reliability was assessed using intraclass correlations for 18 participants who completed a second Block Kids Questionnaire 1 month later. Validity of the Block Kids Questionnaire compared to the 24-hour dietary recall was assessed for the whole sample and by age group using paired t tests and Pearson correlation coefficients adjusted for attenuation and energy intake. Participants were 83 children and adolescents (57% Hispanic, 21% African-American, and 23% white; 53% were female subjects, mean age 13 years). The Block Kids Questionnaire mean daily consumption values were higher for percent energy from carbohydrate, and servings of fruit, 100% fruit juice, and vegetables, and lower for all other categories compared to the 24-hour dietary recall. All reliability intraclass correlations were >0.30, except percent energy from protein and fruit/vegetable servings. Significant differences in the means between the two dietary assessment methods were noted for most nutrients/food groups. The adjusted correlation coefficients ranged from 0.69 for percent energy from carbohydrate to –0.03 for grain servings, with 60% of the food group servings <0.18. Overall, the majority of the correlation coefficients for children aged >12 years were higher than those aged </=12 years. These results suggest that the Block Kids Questionnaire has validity for some nutrients, but not most food groups assessed, and appears more useful for adolescents.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014