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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHEMISTRY OF NATURAL PRODUCTS FOR PEST MANAGEMENT AND CROP DEVELOPMENT

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Extraction, Separation, Identification and Quantity Analysis of Plant Substances

Authors
item Muzychkina, L.K. - INST. PLT BIO & BIOTECH
item Korulkin, D.J. - INST. PLT BIO & BIOTECH
item Zavadskiy, V.A. - INST. PLT BIO & BIOTECH
item Cantrell, Charles

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2008
Publication Date: April 15, 2008
Citation: Muzychkina, L., Korulkin, D., Zavadskiy, V., Cantrell, C.L. 2008. Extraction, Separation, Identification and Quantity Analysis of Plant Substances. Book Chapter. Vassilyev, J., Gemedjiyeva, N., Sitpaeva, G., Cantrell, C.L., Mamonov, L. 2008. Preparation of Plant Samples for Phytochemical Research and the Study of Their Biological Activities. Book Chapter. In: Introduction to Phytochemical Investigations and Discovering Biological Activities of Phytogenous Substances. Eds. B.M. Butin and B.A. Sarsenbaev. Institute of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Almaty, Kazakhstan. pp. 87-126.

Interpretive Summary: Phytochemical investigations often begin with a series of crude extractions consisting of a series of solvents progressing from non-polar to polar. The crude extracts are further separated using liquid/liquid chromatography techniques to enable broad separations based on liquid solubility. Finally a series of chromatographic column purifications are chosen based on the origin fraction solubilities and thin layer chromatography results. This is usually a combination of both normal and reverse phase silica gel chromatography; however, a number of different solid phases are available. Identification of isolated bioactive constituents typically involves a combination of high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques. For novel compounds, NMR techniques almost always involve both one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques.

Technical Abstract: Phytochemical investigations often begin with a series of crude extractions consisting of a series of solvents progressing from non-polar to polar. The crude extracts are further separated using liquid/liquid chromatography techniques to enable broad separations based on liquid solubility. Finally a series of chromatographic column purifications are chosen based on the origin fraction solubilities and thin layer chromatography results. This is usually a combination of both normal and reverse phase silica gel chromatography; however, a number of different solid phases are available. Identification of isolated bioactive constituents typically involves a combination of high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques. For novel compounds, NMR techniques almost always involve both one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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