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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICALLY BASED INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF INVASIVE AQUATIC AND RIPARIAN WEEDS

Location: Exotic and Invasive Weeds Research

Title: Evaluation of late summer imazapyr treatment for Managing Giant Reed (Arundo donax)

Authors
item SPENCER, DAVID
item Tan, Wailun - UC DAVIS
item Liow, Pui Sze
item Ksander, Gregory
item Whitehand, Linda

Submitted to: Journal of Aquatic Plant Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 12, 2008
Publication Date: January 1, 2009
Citation: Spencer, D.F., Tan, W., Liow, P., Ksander, G.G., Whitehand, L.C. 2009. Evaluation of Late Summer Imazapyr Treatment for Managing Giant Reed (Arundo donax). Journal of Aquatic Plant Management. 47:40-43

Interpretive Summary: Giant reed is an invasive plant of riparian habitats. There is little data on the efficacy of imazapyr which has recently been approved for giant reed control in California. We monitored a site where imazapyr had been applied. Plants treated with 1.5% imazapyr had reduced leaf chlorophyll content after treatment but recovered the following spring. Imazapyr treatment did not significantly reduce the proportion of living stems or prevent the production of new stems during the spring following treatment.

Technical Abstract: Giant reed may invade riparian habitats throughout California and the United States. Imazapyr has only been recently approved for use in controlling this species in California. There is little published data on the efficacy of imazapyr which can be used to select an appropriate application regime for California habitats. We monitored a site where imazapyr had been applied with the purpose of testing the hypotheses that a 1.5% solution of imazapyr applied as a foliar spray was effective at killing giant reed. Plants treated with 1.5% imazapyr had reduced leaf chlorophyll content after treatment but recovered the following spring. Treatment with 1.5% imazapyr did not significantly reduce the proportion of living stems or prevent the production of new stems during the spring following treatment.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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