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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GLASSY-WINGED SHARPSHOOTER AND PIERCE'S DISEASE

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Populations of sharpshooters in two citrus groves in east-central Florida as indicated by yellow sticky card traps

Authors
item Hall, David
item Hunter, Wayne

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 9, 2008
Publication Date: September 1, 2008
Citation: Hall, D.G., Hunter, W.B. 2008. Populations of sharpshooters in two citrus groves in east-central Florida as indicated by yellow sticky card traps. Florida Entomologist. 91(3):488-490.

Interpretive Summary: Sharpshooter infestations in Florida citrus are a concern due to potential introduction of citrus variegated chlorosis, a serious disease of citrus caused by a strain of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. The disease is transmitted by some sharpshooter species and, although not present in the United States, the disease is present in Brazil and could be introduced into the United States. We recently surveyed two citrus groves in east-central Florida for sharpshooters. Three sharpshooter species were captured on yellow sticky card traps in each grove: Homalodisca insolita, H. vitripennis and Oncometopia nigricans. H. vitripennis and O. nigricans were relatively common and H. vitripennis relatively abundant over a three year period in a block of mature trees that frequently needed mowing and that was surrounded by an array of plant species. These two sharpshooter species were uncommon during an 18 month study in a young block of trees within a well-manicured grove. Both species had previously been shown to occur in Florida citrus, but numbers of H. vitripennis trapped were larger than expected based on published information. H. vitripennis and O. nigricans are known to transmit citrus variegated chlorosis. H. insolita was detected at each grove but uncommon on traps, possibly due to the height at which traps were operated.

Technical Abstract: Three sharpshooter species were captured on yellow sticky card traps in two citrus groves in east-central Florida: Homalodisca insolita, H. vitripennis and Oncometopia nigricans. H. vitripennis and O. nigricans were relatively common and H. vitripennis relatively abundant over a three year period in a block of mature trees that frequently needed mowing and that was surrounded by an array of plant species. These two sharpshooter species were uncommon during an 18 month study in a young block of trees within a well-manicured grove. H. insolita was detected at each grove but uncommon on traps, possibly due to the height at which traps were operated.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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