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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Development and height characteristics of sunflower accessions evaluated for pest resistance

Authors
item Aiken, R - KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
item Charlet, Laurence
item Seiler, Gerald
item Miller, Jerry - RETIRED ARS

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 16, 2008
Publication Date: March 17, 2008
Repository URL: http://www.sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Aiken_Simulation_08.pdf
Citation: Aiken, R., Charlet, L.D., Seiler, G.J., Miller, J.F. 2008. Development and height characteristics of sunflower accessions evaluated for pest resistance. 30th Sunflower Research Workshop, National Sunflower Association, January 10-11, 2008, Fargo, ND. Available: http://www.sunflowernsa.com/research/research-workshop/documents/Aiken_Simulation_08.pdf

Interpretive Summary: Sunflower yield potential, in the central US High Plains, may be limited by delayed planting to avoid stem weevil and sunflower moth infestations. Germplasm resistant to these pests could extend the growing season and yield potential-possibly up to 25%. Knowledge of growth and development characteristics of resistant sunflower accessions can facilitate breeding techniques to incorporate resistance traits into adapted sunflower hybrids. The objective of the research was to compare leaf appearance, reproductive development and plant height of selected sunflower accessions screened for pest resistance over two years, 2006 and 2007. Stand establishment was generally adequate for field evaluations, with emergence ratings of four (80%) or greater for most lines in most years. Leaf appearance values ranged from vegetative stage 4 to 8 at time of mid-vegetative observations, indicating similarity in emergence and vegetative development. Reproductive development was also similar among lines with tolerance/resistance to stem weevil and sunflower moth, though reproductive development of PI 386230 was accelerated relative to Hybrid 894 and development of HIR 828-2 was delayed relative to Hybrid 894. Plant height was greater in 2007 than that in 2006. Among lines indicating stem weevil tolerance or resistance, four were considered short-stature (less than 4.5' or 1.35m), with the remainder mid-stature. Among lines indicating sunflower moth tolerance or resistance, seven were considered mid-stature and three were tall-stature (greater than 7' or 2.1 m). Emergence and development behavior of sunflower accessions evaluated for stem weevil and sunflower moth resistance is expected to be similar to that of Hybrid 894, though additional effects of photoperiod may modify the timing of reproductive development. Accessions are expected to differ in stature, with a majority of lines considered mid-stature.

Technical Abstract: Sunflower yield potential, in the central US High Plains, may be limited by delayed planting to avoid stem weevil and sunflower moth infestations. Germplasm resistant to these pests could extend the growing season and yield potential-possibly up to 25%. Knowledge of growth and development characteristics of resistant sunflower accessions can facilitate breeding techniques to incorporate resistance traits into adapted sunflower hybrids. The objective of the research was to compare leaf appearance, reproductive development and plant height of selected sunflower accessions screened for pest resistance over two years, 2006 and 2007. Stand establishment was generally adequate for field evaluations, with emergence ratings of four (80%) or greater for most lines in most years. Leaf appearance values ranged from vegetative stage 4 to 8 at time of mid-vegetative observations, indicating similarity in emergence and vegetative development. Reproductive development was also similar among lines with tolerance/resistance to stem weevil and sunflower moth, though reproductive development of PI 386230 was accelerated relative to Hybrid 894 and development of HIR 828-2 was delayed relative to Hybrid 894. Plant height was greater in 2007 than that in 2006. Among lines indicating stem weevil tolerance or resistance, four were considered short-stature (less than 4.5' or 1.35m), with the remainder mid-stature. Among lines indicating sunflower moth tolerance or resistance, seven were considered mid- stature and three were tall-stature (greater than 7' or 2.1 m). Emergence and development behavior of sunflower accessions evaluated for stem weevil and sunflower moth resistance is expected to be similar to that of Hybrid 894, though additional effects of photoperiod may modify the timing of reproductive development. Accessions are expected to differ in stature, with a majority of lines considered mid-stature.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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