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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Ultraviolet spectral fingerprints: A simple approach for classification of bean cultivars

Authors
item Luthria, Devanand
item Pastor Corrales, Marcial
item Harnly, James

Submitted to: Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 27, 2008
Publication Date: June 1, 2008
Citation: Luthria, D.L., Pastor Corrales, M.A., Harnly, J.M. 2008. Ultraviolet spectral fingerprints: A simple approach for classification of bean cultivars. Bean Improvement Cooperative Annual Report. 51:132-133.

Interpretive Summary: Dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a staple food for many Latin American and African countries and are largely recognized as a beneficial source of proteins. In our earlier publications, we had described isolation and identification of phenolic acids and polyphenols from different bean cultivars commonly consumed in United States. In continuation of our research, we have evaluated application of a simple ultraviolet-visible spectral fingerprinting approach for categorization of different bean cultivars commonly consumed in the United States. This research will also be useful for bean breeders and nutrition professionals.

Technical Abstract: Genetics and a variety of environmental factors can lead to chemical differences in the same plant materials. A simple and inexpensive method is described that allows the categorization of different bean cultivars. Nine cultivars of bean samples grown in three different states (Maryland, Michigan, and Nebraska) were extracted and analyzed. This method uses an extraction of powdered beans with methanol-water (60:40, % v/v). The extract is examined using an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer to measure the absorbance from 220 to 700 nm. All spectral data were converted to the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) files and exported for chemometrics analysis. Spectral data is analyzed using a pattern recognition program called analysis of variance-principal components analysis (ANOVA-PCA). This method allows the rapid and inexpensive categorization of different bean cultivars commonly consumed in United States.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014