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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Fiber and yarn properties improve with new cotton variety

Authors
item Foulk, Jonn
item MEREDITH, WILLIAM
item Mcalister, David - USTER
item Luke, Daniel - COOPER POWER SYSTEMS

Submitted to: Journal of Cotton Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 26, 2009
Publication Date: October 15, 2009
Citation: Foulk, J.A., Meredith Jr, W.R., Mcalister, D., Luke, D. 2010. Fiber and yarn properties improve with new cotton variety. Journal of Cotton Science. 13(3):212-220.

Interpretive Summary: The overall aim of this article was to summarize the fiber properties of samples consisting of cottons containing two genetically different parents and their progeny. This study evaluated fibers produced by cotton parents and their progeny using results generated via the Stelometer, Peyer AL101, Fibrograph, HVI™, AFIS™, Favimat, Fiber Dimensional Analysis System (FDAS), and miniature spinning. The USDA Cotton Quality Research Station often collaborates with breeders to develop new varieties to unravel processing problems. Improved fiber quality is needed to make USA cotton more competitive in the world market and improve USA textile mill efficiency. With increased processing speeds, cotton fiber classification and cotton breeding improvements are required. The progeny cotton displayed better-quality fiber and yarn properties tested under a wide range of conditions.

Technical Abstract: Cottons containing two different parents (FM832 and MD51neOK) and their progeny were selected to cover a cotton breeding succession and to determine breeding influences on fiber results. The objective of this study was to evaluate fibers produced by cotton parents and their progeny using results generated via the Stelometer, Peyer AL101, Fibrograph, HVI™, AFIS™, Favimat, Fiber Dimensional Analysis System (FDAS) 765, and miniature spinning. The Favimat, a single fiber testing machine, was used to measure fibers from two different parents and their progeny. In order to get a representation of certain fibers within these samples, the cotton was further divided into the 17 and 19 Suter-Webb array length groups. These fibers range in length from 1.00 to 1.125 in (length group 17) and 1.125 to 1.25 (length group 19). Traditional fiber bundle testing was compared to single fiber testing and miniature spinning performed for complementary yarn testing. Single fiber strength and fineness testing was performed using the Favimat. The FDAS 765 performs non-contact dimensional analysis along the fibers length. Cottons in this study were broken at different loading rates from 0.3 cm/min for the Stelometer, 2 cm/min for the Favimat, 13.6 cm/min for the HVI™, and 25.4 cm/min for the Statimat-M with respective progeny fiber or yarn strengths of 32, 32, 41, and 27 g/tex. Progeny fineness along with fiber and yarn strengths were all improved from its parents with lower yarn hairiness values. The progeny cotton displayed better-quality fiber and yarn properties tested under a wide range of conditions.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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