Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL HYDROLOGY AND MANAGEMENT EFFECTS ON EROSION AND WATER QUALITY Title: Impacts of a Swine Manure Spill on Phosphorus Partitioning in a Fluvial System: Evaluation of an alternative Manure Spill Remediation Method

Authors
item Armstrong, S - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Smith, Douglas
item Owens, P - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Joern, B - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Huang, Chi Hua

Submitted to: American Society of Limnology and Oceanography
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 15, 2008
Publication Date: June 8, 2008
Citation: Armstrong, S., Smith, D.R., Owens, P.R., Joern, B.C., Huang, C. 2008. Impacts of a Swine Manure Spill on Phosphorus Partitioning in a Fluvial System: Evaluation of an alternative Manure Spill Remediation Method. American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Society of Canadian Limnolgists, North American Benthological Society. June 8-13, 2008, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada. 2008 CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Within the last decade there has been an international shift in livestock production that has resulted in an increased herd size per farm and a greater frequency of manure spills. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the P partitioning between fluvial sediments following a manure spill and to evaluate the effectiveness of chemically treating exposed sediments. Ditch sediments were placed in four flumes, and a manure spill was simulated for 23 hr using swine manure flowing over ditch sediments in three of the flumes. Following the manure spill, there were three treatments to the sediment: (1) no manure and no treatment; (2) manure spill but no treatment of sediments; (3) manure spill followed by 1:1 molar ratio (Al:P) application of aluminum sulfate (alum) and calcium carbonate; and (4) manure spill followed by 2:1 molar ratio (Al:P) application of alum and calcium carbonate. Using P free water, P desorption from the sediments was then monitored for a 24 hr period. After 23 hr of manure spill soluble P (SP) concentrations were 3.80 mg P L-1 compared to 0.02 mg L-1 before the manure spill. When clayey sediments were used, there was a 50% reduction in SP concentrations when comparing the 1:1 treatment to the manure spill without treatment, while the 2:1 treatment reduced SP concentrations to near background concentrations (as measured by the no manure, no treatment flumes). This study suggests that alum and calcium carbonate have the potential to be an effective tool for reducing P losses following a manure spill.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014