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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Seed Deterioration Increases in the Presence of Volatiles

Authors
item Mira, S - E.U.I.T. AGRÍCOLA
item Walters, Christina
item Hill, Lisa
item Estrelles, E - UNIVERSITAT DE VALÈNCIA
item Gonzalez-Benito, M.E - E.U.I.T. AGRÍCOLA

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 6, 2008
Publication Date: July 6, 2008
Citation: Mira, S., Walters, C.T., Hill, L.M., Estrelles, E., Gonzalez-Benito, M.E. 2008. Seed deterioration increases in the presence of volatiles. 9th International Society for Seed Science Conference on Seed Biology. July 6-11, 2008. Olsztyn, Poland. pp. 89. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Seeds of culinary importance emit low molecular weight carbonyl compounds that can be detected as volatiles in the surrounding air. Volatile carbonyl molecules are byproducts of cascading peroxidative reactions and can be highly reactive against proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Carum carvi L. produces large amounts of volatile carbonyls including acetaldehyde, methanol and ethanol and several unidentified compounds. Lactuca sativa (lettuce) and Eruca sativa Mill (aurugula) produce fewer volatile compounds. To test the previously-proposed link between concentration of volatile compounds and seed aging rate (e.g., Lee et al., 2000), we monitored seed viability within mixtures of caraway, aurugula and lettuce. The rate of aging of lettuce seeds stored at 35ºC and 75%RH increased when it was mixed with caraway seeds (half life period decreased from about 70 days to about 28 days). Aging rate varied according to the amount and types of volatiles present, which was manipulated by the relative humidity of storage and the proportion of caraway in the lettuce mixture. Analyses of volatile production and seed aging kinetics help to describe the interrelationships between molecular mobility within glasses and chemical reactivity.

Technical Abstract: Seeds of culinary importance emit low molecular weight carbonyl compounds that can be detected as volatiles in the surrounding air. Volatile carbonyl molecules are byproducts of cascading peroxidative reactions and can be highly reactive against proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Carum carvi L. produces large amounts of volatile carbonyls including acetaldehyde, methanol and ethanol and several unidentified compounds. Lactuca sativa (lettuce) and Eruca sativa Mill (aurugula) produce fewer volatile compounds. To test the previously-proposed link between concentration of volatile compounds and seed aging rate (e.g., Lee et al., 2000), we monitored seed viability within mixtures of caraway, aurugula and lettuce. The rate of aging of lettuce seeds stored at 35ºC and 75%RH increased when it was mixed with caraway seeds (half life period decreased from about 70 days to about 28 days). Aging rate varied according to the amount and types of volatiles present, which was manipulated by the relative humidity of storage and the proportion of caraway in the lettuce mixture. Analyses of volatile production and seed aging kinetics help to describe the interrelationships between molecular mobility within glasses and chemical reactivity.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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