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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EXOTIC, EMERGING, RE-EMERGING, AND INVASIVE PLANT DISEASES OF HORTICULTURAL CROPS

Location: Horticultural Crops Research

Title: Phytophthora ramorum: A Pathogen with a Remarkably Wide Host Range Causing Sudden Oak Death on Oaks and Ramorum Blight on Woody Ornamentals

Authors
item Grunwald, Niklaus
item Goss, Erica
item Press, Caroline

Submitted to: Molecular Plant Pathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 29, 2008
Publication Date: November 3, 2008
Citation: Grunwald, N.J., Goss, E.M., Press, C.M. 2008. Phytophthora ramorum: A pathogen with a remarkably wide host range causing sudden oak death on oaks and ramorum blight on woody ornamentals. Molecular Plant Pathology. 9(6):729-740.

Interpretive Summary: Phytophthora ramorum is a plant pathogen commonly known as a water mold. This organism is a relative of the pathogen that causes potato late blight. P. ramorum is the causal agent of sudden oak death on coast live oak and tanoak as well as Ramorum blight on woody ornamental and forest understory plant hosts. It causes stem cankers on trees, and leaf blight or stem dieback on ornamentals. This pathogen is managed by eradication where feasible, by containment elsewhere, and by quarantine in many parts of the world. This review provides a current overview about the pathogenicity, population genetics, evolution and genomics of P. ramorum. Particular emphasis is placed on advances made since the whole genome sequence of this organism was published.

Technical Abstract: Phytophthora ramorum is an oomycete plant pathogen classified in the kingdom Stramenopiles. P. ramorum is the causal agent of sudden oak death on coast live oak and tanoak as well as Ramorum blight on woody ornamental and forest understory plant hosts. It causes stem cankers on trees, and leaf blight or stem dieback on ornamentals. This pathogen is managed by eradication where feasible, by containment elsewhere, and by quarantine in many parts of the world. Genomic resources have improved tremendously since the sequencing of the genome in 2004. This review provides a current overview about the pathogenicity, population genetics, evolution and genomics of P. ramorum.

Last Modified: 7/27/2014
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