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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCE MARKET QUALITY, REDUCE POSTHARVEST LOSS, AND INCREASE UTILIZATION OF DECIDUOUS TREE FRUITS Title: Post-storage 'Granny Smith' Metabolome and Superficial Scald Severity is altered by Postharvest Ultraviolet/White Light Irradiation

Authors
item Rudell, David
item Mattheis, James

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 2008
Publication Date: July 15, 2008
Citation: Rudell Jr, D.R., Mattheis, J.P. 2008. Post-storage 'Granny Smith' Metabolome and Superficial Scald Severity is altered by Postharvest Ultraviolet/White Light Irradiation. Meeting Abstract.

Technical Abstract: Orchard light exposure can provoke favorable as well as deleterious peel characteristics during and following cold storage. Development of superficial scald on susceptible apple cultivars is exacerbated by low light exposure during the growing season. Global metabolic profiling was used to evaluate diverse peel metabolites from ‘Granny Smith’ apples bagged on the tree then exposed to artificial UV-white light after harvest. Fruit were air-stored at 1 degree C for 6 months and then held for 4 days at 20 degree C. Scald was eliminated on the side of the fruit exposed to artificial light and reduced on the unexposed side, where light was limited, with increasing light treatment duration. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the peel metabolome revealed associations between scald status, light treatment duration, and individual metabolites from multiple pathways including many from the isoprenoid and phenylpropanoid pathways. Relationships between metabolites from multiple pathways and scald, including isoprenoid and phenylpropanoid pathways, which are typically associated with scald incidence, were revealed. Likewise, pathways related to fruit quality were altered indicating that preharvest light environment can profoundly alter the post-storage peel metabolome, even on the same fruit.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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