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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Cotton Ginning Industry: Past, Present, and Future

Authors
item Valco, Thomas
item Ashley, Harrison - NATIONAL COTTON GINNERS A

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 11, 2008
Publication Date: May 1, 2008
Citation: Valco, T.D., Ashley, H. 2008. The Cotton Ginning Industry: Past, Present, and Future. In the Proceedings of the National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference. January 8-11, 2008, Nashville, TN. 2008 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: In summary, gins are looking for every opportunity to improve the bottom line by increasing capacity (bales per hour), increasing volume (bales per season), and increasing value by increasing efficiency and preserving fiber quality. To be competitive in the market, gins have in the past and continue to adopt new technology to reduce labor costs and operating cost. Gins must continue to educate managers and workers in programs to improve operational and maintenance practices and incorporate best management practices for efficient ginning to maintain fiber quality and improve profitability. Gins must have an active safety training program that supports the importance of safe ginning practices from the management down to all gin workers. Gins must also provide additional services, seed storage, warehousing, etc., to extend their operational times throughout the year.

Technical Abstract: The cotton ginning industry has adopted many changes in cotton production, processing and marketing over the past years. Current trends show reduced cotton acreage, shifts in cotton production regions, and changes in cotton markets. To be competitive, gins must look for every opportunity to improve the bottom line by increasing capacity (bales per hour), volume (bales per season), and cotton value by improving processing efficiency and preserving fiber quality. Gins must continue to educate managers and workers in programs to improve operational and maintenance practices and incorporate best management practices for efficient ginning to maintain fiber quality and improve profitability. Gins must become increasingly sophisticated with the use of new technology to reduce labor and operating costs, while optimizing market value.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014
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