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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PROTOZOAN PARASITES AFFECTING FOOD ANIMALS, FOOD SAFETY, AND PUBLIC HEALTH Title: Molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and assessment of zoonotic transmission

Authors
item Xiao, Lihua - CDC, ATLANTA, GA
item Fayer, Ronald

Submitted to: International Journal for Parasitology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 2008
Publication Date: June 3, 2008
Citation: Xiao, L., Fayer, R. 2008. Molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and assessment of zoonotic transmission. International Journal for Parasitology. 38(2008):1239-1255.

Interpretive Summary: The molecular characterization of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is essential for accurately identifying organisms and assessing zoonotic transmission. Results of recent molecular epidemiologic studies strongly suggest that zoonotic transmission plays an important role in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology in industrialized nations, especially in Europe. In such cases the most prevalent zoonotic species is C. parvum. In contrast, zoonotic transmission of C. parvum is largely absent in developing countries. Genotyping and subtyping data suggest that zoonotic transmission is not significant in giardiasis epidemiology in either developing or industrialized countries. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is a relatively recent application that is evolving as new genes are being found that increase the accuracy of identification while discovering greater diversity of species and yet unnamed taxa within these two important genera. As molecular data accumulate our understanding of the role of zoonotic transmission in epidemiology and clinical manifestations is becoming clearer.

Technical Abstract: The molecular characterization of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is essential for accurately identifying organisms and assessing zoonotic transmission. Results of recent molecular epidemiologic studies strongly suggest that zoonotic transmission plays an important role in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology in industrialized nations, especially in Europe. In such cases the most prevalent zoonotic species is C. parvum. In contrast, zoonotic transmission of C. parvum is largely absent in developing countries. Genotyping and subtyping data suggest that zoonotic transmission is not significant in giardiasis epidemiology in either developing or industrialized countries. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is a relatively recent application that is evolving as new genes are being found that increase the accuracy of identification while discovering greater diversity of species and yet unnamed taxa within these two important genera. As molecular data accumulate our understanding of the role of zoonotic transmission in epidemiology and clinical manifestations is becoming clearer.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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