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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DOMESTIC, EXOTIC, AND EMERGING DISEASES OF CITRUS, VEGETABLES, AND ORNAMENTALS (DEED) Title: A review of ipomoviruses and watermelon vine decline caused by the newly-described and whitefly-transmitted squash vein yellowing virus

Authors
item Adkins, Scott
item Webb, S. E. - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Roberts, P. D. - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Kousik, Chandrasekar
item Stansly, P. A. - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Bruton, Benny
item Achor, D. - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Muchovej, R. M. - UNIV. OF FLORIDA
item Baker, C. A. - FDACS-DPI

Submitted to: Bemisia International Workshop Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2008
Publication Date: July 1, 2010
Citation: Adkins, S.T., Webb, S., Roberts, P., Kousik, C.S., Stansly, P., Bruton, B.D., Achor, D., Muchovej, R., Baker, C. 2010. A review of ipomoviruses and watermelon vine decline caused by the newly-described and whitefly-transmitted squash vein yellowing virus. Bemisia International Workshop Proceedings.

Interpretive Summary: This report provides a general review of the ipomoviruses and a specific overview of watermelon vine decline in Florida and its causal agent, Squash vein yellowing virus. This report summarizes the ongoing cooperative research effort between ARS, University of Florida and FDACS-DPI, and provides a timely account to growers, Extension personnel and state and Federal regulatory and research scientists.

Technical Abstract: Though few in number, ipomoviruses cause significant disease in cucurbits and other crops in various parts of the world. As the causal agent of watermelon vine decline in Florida, Squash vein yellowing virus has recently become an economically important pathogen.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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