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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING SOIL AND NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR SUSTAINED PRODUCTIVITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

Location: Soil Plant Nutrient Research (SPNR)

Title: Residual Effects Of Manure and N Fertilizer On Corn Yield and Soil N and P Under Drip and Furrow Irrigation

Authors
item Berrada, Abdel - CO ST U AVRC, ROCKY FORD
item Halvorson, Ardell
item Bartolo, Michael - CO ST U, AVRC, ROCKY FORD
item Valliant, James - CO ST U AVRC, ROCKY FORD

Submitted to: Proceedings of Great Plains Soil Fertility Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 12, 2008
Publication Date: March 4, 2008
Citation: Berrada, A., Halvorson, A.D., Bartolo, M., Valliant, J. Residual Effects Of Manure and N Fertilizer On Corn Yield and Soil N and P Under Drip and Furrow Irrigation. In Proc. of Great Plains Soil Fertility Conference. Denver, CO March 4-5, 2008. Kansas State University, Manhattan and Potash and Phosphate Institute, Brookings, SD. 12:245-251.

Interpretive Summary: A field experiment was conducted at the Arkansas Valley Research Center in 2007 to test the residual effects of two years (2005 and 2006) of manure application (10, 20, and 30 tons/acre) and N fertilizer (60, 120, and 180 lb N/acre) on corn yield, N and P uptake, and soil N03-N and P concentrations under subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) and furrow irrigation (FrI). There were no significant differences in corn yield between SDI and FrI in 2005, 2006, and 2007, even though, on average, 43% more water was applied with FrI than with SDI. The highest corn yields were obtained with 180 lb N/acre in 2005 and with as little as 60 lb N/acre or 10 tons of manure/acre in 2006. With no N fertilizer or manure applied in 2007, the residual manure and high N rate treatments produced an average of 224 bu/acre of corn. At the end of 2007, there was enough residual soil N left in the high manure treatment to produce top corn yields for two years. Applying manure in excess of crop nutrient requirements can lead to N and P buildup in the soil and associated water pollution hazards, as demonstrated in this study.

Technical Abstract: A field experiment was conducted at the Arkansas Valley Research Center in 2007 to test the residual effects of two years (2005 and 2006) of manure application (10, 20, and 30 tons/acre) and N fertilizer (60, 120, and 180 lb N/acre) on corn yield, N and P uptake, and soil N03-N and P concentrations under subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) and furrow irrigation (FrI). There were no significant differences in corn yield between SDI and FrI in 2005, 2006, and 2007, even though, on average, 43% more water was applied with FrI than with SDI. The highest corn yields were obtained with 180 lb N/acre in 2005 and with as little as 60 lb N/acre or 10 tons of manure/acre in 2006. With no N fertilizer or manure applied in 2007, the residual manure and high N rate treatments produced an average of 224 bu/acre of corn. At the end of 2007, there was enough residual soil N left in the high manure treatment to produce top corn yields for two years. Applying manure in excess of crop nutrient requirements can lead to N and P buildup in the soil and associated water pollution hazards, as demonstrated in this study. [GRACENet publication].

Last Modified: 8/30/2014