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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF RUSTS OF CEREAL CROPS Title: Control of stripe rusts of wheat and barley

Authors
item Chen, Xianming
item Wood, David
item Penman, L - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Lin, F - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Liu, Y - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Wang, M - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Zhao, J - WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
item Coram, Tristan
item Richardson, Kelley

Submitted to: Scientific and Technical Review
Publication Type: Research Technical Update
Publication Acceptance Date: April 25, 2007
Publication Date: June 1, 2007
Repository URL: http://css.wsu.edu/proceedings
Citation: Chen, X., Wood, D.A., Penman, L., Lin, F., Liu, Y.M., Wang, M.N., Zhao, J., Coram, T., Rutherford, K.J. 2007. Control of stripe rusts of wheat and barley. 2007 Field Day Abstracts: Highlights of Research Progress, Crop & Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Technical Report 07-1, page 26.

Interpretive Summary: Rusts of wheat and barley were monitored throughout the Pacific Northwest (PNW) using trap plots and through field surveys during the 2006 growing season. Through collaborators in other states, stripe rusts of wheat and barley were monitored throughout the US. In 2006, wheat stripe rust occurred in more than 20 states, but the disease was generally much less than in 2005 due to the weather conditions unfavorable to stripe rust. However, the disease caused 15% yield losses in California and up to 28% yield losses on susceptible winter and spring wheat cultivars in our experimental plots. Barley stripe rust occurred in Arizona, California, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, but the damage was low. Leaf rust and stem rust were either light or absent in the PNW. A total of 18 wheat stripe rust races and 11 barley stripe rust races were identified, of which five wheat stripe rust and two barley stripe rust races were new. In 2006, we evaluated more than 16,000 wheat and 5,000 barley entries for resistance to stripe rust and other diseases. We have mapped four genes in wheat and one gene in barley for durable high-temperature, adult-plant resistance and four genes in wheat and two genes in barley for race-specific all-stage resistance to stripe rust. In 2006, we evaluated nine foliar fungicide treatments and eight seed treatments for control of stripe rust. Better chemicals, formulations, and application schedules were identified.

Technical Abstract: Rusts of wheat and barley were monitored throughout the Pacific Northwest (PNW) using trap plots and through field surveys during the 2006 growing season. Through collaborators in other states, stripe rusts of wheat and barley were monitored throughout the US. In 2006, wheat stripe rust occurred in more than 20 states, but the disease was generally much less than in 2005 due to the weather conditions unfavorable to stripe rust. However, the disease caused 15% yield losses in California and up to 28% yield losses on susceptible winter and spring wheat cultivars in our experimental plots. Barley stripe rust occurred in Arizona, California, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, but the damage was low. Leaf rust and stem rust were either light or absent in the PNW. A total of 18 wheat stripe rust races and 11 barley stripe rust races were identified, of which five wheat stripe rust and two barley stripe rust races were new. In 2006, we evaluated more than 16,000 wheat and 5,000 barley entries for resistance to stripe rust and other diseases. We have mapped four genes in wheat and one gene in barley for durable high-temperature, adult-plant resistance and four genes in wheat and two genes in barley for race-specific all-stage resistance to stripe rust. We identified genes regulated by the Yr5 resistance using the microarray technique. To study functional genomics of the stripe rust and further characterize stripe rust populations, we have constructed the first bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and full-length cDNA library for the wheat stripe rust pathogen. From the 196 cDNA clones sequenced, we identified 51 different genes with functions in the fungal growth, defense, and virulence/infection. In 2006, we evaluated nine foliar fungicide treatments and eight seed treatments for control of stripe rust. Better chemicals, formulations, and application schedules were identified.

Last Modified: 11/25/2014
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