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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SURVEILLANCE AND ECOLOGY OF MOSQUITO, BITING AND FILTH BREEDING INSECTS

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research Unit

Title: Chikungunya on an island off the coast of Kenya: Impact on the health of the global community and potential development of an early warning system for U.S.

Authors
item LINTHICUM, KENNETH
item Anyamba, Assaf - NASA-GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT
item Small, Jennifer - NASA-GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT
item Tucker, Compton - NASA-GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT
item Chretien, Jean-Paul - DOD-GEIS-SILVER SPRING,MD
item Brieman, Rob - CDC-KEMRI, NAIROBI, KENYA
item Hightower, Allen - CDC-KEMRI, NAIROBI, KEYNA
item Njenga, M. Kariuki - CDC-KEMRI, NAIROBI, KENYA
item Sang, Rosemary - CDC-KEMRI, NAIROBI, KENYA
item Formenty, Pierre - WHO, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND
item BRITCH, SETH

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 11, 2007
Publication Date: November 11, 2007
Citation: Linthicum, K., Anyamba, A., Small, J., Tucker, C.J., Chretien, J., Brieman, R., Hightower, A., Njenga, M., Sang, R., Formenty, P., Britch, S.C. 2007. Chikungunya on an island off the coast of Kenya: Impact on the health of the global community and potential development of an early warning system for U.S. Florida Mosquito Control Association's 79th Annual Meeting in Jacksonville, FL on November 11-14, 2007.

Technical Abstract: An epidemic of chikungunya fever, a viral disease transmitted by Aedes species mosquitoes, affected hundreds of thousands of people in western Indian Ocean islands and India during 2005—2007, and has caused out outbreak in Italy transmitted by Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. This is the first reported outbreak in a temperate country. The initial outbreaks occurred in coastal Kenya (Lamu, then Mombasa) in 2004. The eco-climatic conditions associated with chikungunya emergence along coastal Kenya using epidemiologic investigations and satellite data have been evaluated. Unusually dry, warm conditions preceded the outbreaks, including the driest since 1998 for some of the coastal regions. Infrequent replenishment of domestic water stores and elevated temperatures may have facilitated chikungunya virus transmission. These results suggest that drought-affected populations may be at heightened risk for chikungunya fever, and underscore the need for safe water storage during drought relief operations. There is a need to the global community to develop early warning systems for arboviruses.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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