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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GINNING AND PROCESSING RESEARCH TO ENHANCE QUALITY, PROFITABILITY, AND TEXTILE UTILITY OF WESTERN COTTONS

Location: Cotton Ginning Research

Title: Using Cyclones Effectively at Cotton Gins

Authors
item Whitelock, Derek
item Armijo, Carlos
item Buser, Michael
item Hughs, Sidney

Submitted to: Applied Engineering in Agriculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 20, 2009
Publication Date: July 31, 2009
Citation: Whitelock, D.P., Armijo, C.B., Buser, M.D., Hughs, S.E. 2009. Using cyclones effectively at cotton gins. Applied Engineering in Agriculture. 25(4):563-576.

Interpretive Summary: Particulate emissions result from cotton ginning where large amounts of air are used to convey seed cotton, seed, lint, and trash. Agricultural operations, including cotton gins, are most often required by the States to use reasonably available control technology or best available control technology to control emissions of particulate matter. The most common type of emissions control device used at cotton ginning plants is the cyclone. Cyclones are efficient, reliable, low-cost, and require little maintenance. When properly sized, constructed, and maintained, cyclones can reduce a gin’s emissions such that the state PM regulations can generally be met. This report is intended to be a tool for gin plant managers and operators aid in determining how to properly size, construct, operate, and maintain cyclones.

Technical Abstract: Cyclones are the most common type of emissions control device used in agricultural processing operations. Cyclones are efficient, reliable, low-cost, and require little maintenance. When used properly, cyclones effectively separate particulate matter from air streams, allowing compliance with state and federal air pollution regulations. Guidelines and techniques intended to help gin plant managers and operators determine if existing cyclones are correctly sized, properly constructed, and adequately maintained are reviewed. Methods presented are such that measurements can be made with minimal equipment and operating parameters determined with simple or no calculations.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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