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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOIL MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS THAT PREVENT WIND EROSION AND ENHANCE THE ENVIRONMENT

Location: Wind Erosion and Water Conservation Research

Title: Cooperative wind erosion mechanics research between USDA-ARS Wind Erosion and Water Conservation Research Unit(WEWC) and Key Lab of Western Environmental Disaster (KLWED), Lanzhou University, Gansu, P.R. China

Authors
item Van Pelt, Robert
item Zobeck, Teddy

Submitted to: Soil and Water Conservation Society Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 21, 2007
Publication Date: July 25, 2007
Citation: Van Pelt, R.S., Zobeck, T.M. 2007. Cooperative wind erosion mechanics research between USDA-ARS Wind Erosion and Water Conservation Research Unit(WEWC) and Key Lab of Western Environmental Disaster (KLWED), Lanzhou University, Gansu, P.R. China[abstract]. Soil and Water Conservation Society, July 21-25, 2007, Tampa, Florida.

Technical Abstract: Broad expanses of bare, fragile soil and frequent high-velocity winds create conditions leading to wind-induced soil loss and fugitive dust generation in the semi-arid regions of the United States and People’s Republic of China. Mechanistic process driven models have necessitated an increased understanding of the physical processes and controlling equations of wind-induced soil movement. WEWC scientists have joined forces with physical modelers at KLWED. The initial phase of the collaboration was initiated almost two years ago is centered on developing a model to predict the vertical flux rate of PM10 based on the soil surface, atmospheric conditions, wind speed, and convective stability. The data are collected from four instrumented towers along a 300 m transect in Big Spring, Texas and analyzed by mechanistic modelers in Lanzhou, P.R. China. The second phase of our collaborative effort began in 2007 and is centered on determining the relative horizontal and vertical rates of particle mixing and partitioning between saltation and transport during active wind erosion. We are conducting wind tunnel experiments utilizing four finite length bands of rare earth labeled sediment composed of three particle size ranges spaced at equal distances down a 50 m wind tunnel that was recently completed at KLWED. The results from the wind tunnel experiments will be modeled to allow optimization of rare earth element placement in field studies of spatial and temporal Aeolian phenomena.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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