Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHEMICAL SIGNALS FOR MANAGING INSECTS Title: Semiochemically based monitoring of the invasion of the brown marmorated stink bug and unexpected attraction of the native green stink bug (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in Maryland

Authors
item Aldrich, Jeffrey
item Khrimian, Ashot
item Camp, Mary - BIOMETRICAL CONSULTING

Submitted to: Florida Entomologist
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 31, 2008
Publication Date: September 25, 2009
Citation: Aldrich, J.R., Khrimian, A., Camp, M. 2009. Semiochemically based monitoring of the invasion of the brown marmorated stink bug and unexpected attraction of the native green stink bug (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in Maryland. Florida Entomologist. 92:483-491.

Interpretive Summary: The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is a newly invasive species in the eastern U. S. that is rapidly expanding its range from the original point of establishment in Allentown, Pennsylvania. BMSM is likely to become an agricultural pest in the U.S., and is already a nuisance because it hibernates in houses and other buildings. Populations of the BMSB and the native green stink bug (GSB) were monitored using chemically baited traps at the Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, Maryland, from 2004 through 2007. Over this time period, the BMSB population rose from being undetectable in 2004 to becoming much more abundantly trapped than the native GSB. This research shows that the spread of the BMSB can be effectively monitored using chemically baited traps, which will be of interest to city managers and state departments of agriculture throughout much of the U. S. Field-trapping data for the GSB provides a baseline for future comparisons that may reveal if the population explosion of the BMSB suppresses populations of the native GSB, information of academic and potentially practical significance

Technical Abstract: The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Pentatomidae), is a newly invasive species in the eastern U. S. that is rapidly expanding its range from the original point of establishment in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Although an attractant pheromone has yet to be identified for the BMSB, the insect in its native Asian range is known to be cross-attracted to the pheromone of another pentatomid, Plautia stali Scott, whose males produce methyl (E,E,Z)-2,4,6-decatrienoate. Previous tests of methyl decatrienoate isomers in the U. S. verified that the BMSB is highly attracted to methyl (E,E,Z)-2,4,6-decatrienoate, and that the native green stink bug (GSB), Acrosternum hilare (Say), is also attracted to this compound. Using traps baited with methyl decatrienoates and the reported pheromone of the GSB (cis- and trans-(Z)-a-bisabolene epoxides), we monitored populations of the BMSB and GSB at the Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, Maryland, from 2004 through 2007. Over this time period, the BMSB population rose from being undetectable in 2004 to becoming much more abundantly trapped than the native GSB. The GSB was significantly more attracted to methyl (E,E,Z)-2,4,6-decatrienoate than the blend of bisabolene epoxides reported as its pheromone, the reasons for which remain unclear. Field-trapping data for A. hilare provides a baseline for future comparisons that may reveal if the exponential population explosion of the BMSB suppresses populations of the native GSB

Last Modified: 11/25/2014