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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Trichoderma martiale sp. nov., a new endophyte from sapwood of Theobroma caco with a potential for biological control

Authors
item Hananda, Rogerio - BRAZIL
item DE Souza, Jorge - BRAZIL
item Pomella, Alan W. - BRAZIL
item Hebbar, K.PRAKASH - MARS,HACKETTESTOWN, NJ
item Pereira, Jose - BRAZIL
item Ismaiel, Ed
item Samuels, Gary

Submitted to: Mycological Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 11, 2008
Publication Date: November 9, 2008
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/21728
Citation: Hananda, R.E., De Souza, J.T., Pomella, A.V., Hebbar, K., Pereira, J.O., Ismaiel, A.A., Samuels, G.J. 2008. Trichoderma martiale sp. nov., a new endophyte from sapwood of Theobroma caco with a potential for biological control. Mycological Research. 112:1335-1343.

Interpretive Summary: Fungi in the genus Trichoderma are effective in the biological control of of plant diseases including those that attack cacao trees, the source of chocolate, in South America and Africa. Development of these biological control agents is hindered by lack of species that can effectively control specific diseases. Many species of Trichoderma grow inside healthy living plants. In this research a new species of Trichoderma was discovered inside the woody tissue of cacao trees in Brazil. This new species was named, described, and illustrated and its closest relatives were determined. In addition this new species of Trichoderma was shown to be effective in controlling black pod rot of the fruits of cacao trees. This research will be used by plant pathologists working to control diseases of cacao in South America and Africa.

Technical Abstract: The new species Trichoderma martiale was isolated as an endophyte from sapwood of Theobroma cacao (cacao) in Brazil. On the basis of sequences of translation-elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1) and RNA polymerase II subunit (rpb2) T. martiale is a close relative of, and morphologically similar to, T. viride but differs in the production of discrete pustules on CMD and SNA, in having a faster rate of growth, and in being tropical in origin. This new species was shown to limit black pod rot of cacao caused by Phytophthora palmivora.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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