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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGICAL, CHEMICAL AND MOLECULAR APPROACHES TO REDUCING TICK BITES AND TICK-BORNE DISEASES Title: Similarity in Responses of Laboratory-Reared Aned Field-Collected Lone Star Tick (Acari:ixodidae)nymphs

Authors
item Carroll, John
item Klun, J - USDA ARS BELTSVILLE MD
item Kramer, M - USDA ARS BELTSVILLE MD

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 18, 2008
Publication Date: October 1, 2008
Citation: Carroll, J.F., Klun, J.A., Kramer, M. 2008. Similarity in responses of laboratory-reared and field-collected lone star tick (Acari:Ixodidae) Nymphs to repellents. Journal of Entomological Science 43(4):426-430.

Interpretive Summary: Ticks and tick-borne diseases are of medical and veterinary importance in the U. S. and many parts of the world. Repellents are the last line of personal protection against tick bite. Field testing tick repellents intended for use on human skin can be difficult. Therefore, laboratory tests using laboratory reared ticks are important. To address concerns that test results obtained with laboratory reared ticks may not reflect the responses of field populations, we tested two repellents, Deet and AI3-37220, in the laboratory against field-collected (MD) lone star ticks and lone star ticks from laboratory colonies from the USDA, ARS, Knipling-Bushland U. S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory and Oklahoma State University. The responses of the ticks from all three sources were similar to one another and clearly distinguished that AI3-37220 was more effective than Deet in repelling lone star tick nymphs. These findings validate testing laboratory reared ticks to approximate the responses of field populations. Scientists involved in repellent research and repellent manufacturers will be interested in these results.

Technical Abstract: Field testing tick repellents intended for use on human skin can be difficult, particularly when multiple concentrations of multiple repellents must be tested. Therefore, laboratory tests using laboratory reared ticks have been important. To address concerns that test results obtained with laboratory reared ticks may not reflect the responses of field populations, we tested two repellents, Deet and AI3-37220, in the laboratory against field-collected (Maryland) lone star ticks and lone star ticks from laboratory colonies from the USDA, ARS, Knipling-Bushland U. S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory and Oklahoma State University. We obtained dose response data using a vertical filter paper bioassay. The responses of the ticks from all three sources were similar to each other and they clearly showed that AI3-37220 was more effective than Deet in repelling lone star tick nymphs. These findings validate testing laboratory reared ticks to approximate the responses of field populations.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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