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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ENHANCED END USE QUALITY AND UTILIZATION OF SORGHUM GRAIN

Location: Grain Quality and Structure Research Unit

Title: Improved viscoelastic zein-starch doughs for leavened gluten-free breads: Their rheology and microstructure

Authors
item Schober, Tilman
item BEAN, SCOTT
item Boyle, Daniel - KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY
item Park, Seok Ho

Submitted to: Journal of Cereal Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 25, 2008
Publication Date: May 10, 2008
Citation: Schober, T.J., Bean, S., Boyle, D.L., Park, S. 2008. Improved viscoelastic zein-starch doughs for leavened gluten-free breads: Their rheology and microstructure. Journal of Cereal Science. 48:755-767.

Interpretive Summary: Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by protein sequences in wheat, rye and barley. Permitted gluten-free grains include rice, maize and sorghum. Traditional gluten-free breads are made from soft, batter-like doughs based on these gluten-free grains, and are often of very poor quality. It has long been known that certain maize proteins and starch form a dough very similar to wheat dough when mixed at 35-40 °C. However, use of this phenomenon for bread production was not possible. In the present study, we succeeded in the development of superior gluten-free bread from zein dough, which closely resembled wheat bread. We also studied the structural and physicochemical background of zein doughs. We could derive several conclusions relevant for practical baking and significant theoretical understanding. The new type of zein dough can also be used for specialties like soft pretzels and rolls not feasible with traditional gluten-free batters. These results may also help in the development of improved sorghum breads.

Technical Abstract: Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by protein sequences in wheat, rye and barley. Permitted gluten-free grains include rice, maize and sorghum. Traditional gluten-free breads are made from soft, batter-like doughs based on these gluten-free grains, and are often of very poor quality. It has long been known that certain maize proteins and starch form a dough very similar to wheat dough when mixed at 35-40 °C. However, use of this phenomenon for bread production was not possible. In the present study, we succeeded in the development of superior gluten-free bread from zein dough, which closely resembled wheat bread. We also studied the structural and physicochemical background of zein doughs. We could derive several conclusions relevant for practical baking and significant theoretical understanding. The new type of zein dough can also be used for specialties like soft pretzels and rolls not feasible with traditional gluten-free batters. These results may also help in the development of improved sorghum breads.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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