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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC AND CULTURAL METHODS TO MANAGE CYST NEMATODE IN SOYBEANS Title: Short and Long-term Tillage Effects on Heterodera Glycines Reproduction in Soyean Monoculture in West Tennessee

Authors
item Donald, Patricia
item Tyler, Donald - UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE
item Boykin, Deborah

Submitted to: Soil & Tillage Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 23, 2008
Publication Date: May 19, 2009
Citation: Donald, P.A., Tyler, D.D., Boykin, D.L. 2009. Short and Long-term Tillage Effects on Heterodera Glycines Reproduction in Soyean Monoculture in West Tennessee. Soil & Tillage Research. 104:126-133

Interpretive Summary: Soybean cyst nematode has been documented as the pathogen most consistently causing yield loss in USA soybean production fields almost since its discovery in this country. No-tillage (only very narrow band of soil is disturbed in planting of seed) has been adopted in much of the soybean production areas to preserve soil and nutrients. The impact of this production practice on soybean cyst nematode has been evaluated since the introduction of the practice over thirty years ago, and mixed results on the impact have been recorded. In a study at Jackson, TN soybean cyst nematode reproduction was almost twice as high in treatments which changed from no-tillage to tilled treatments than the reverse (tilled treatments changed to no-tillage). The effects of tillage on numbers of soybean cyst nematode eggs present in the soil were primarily found during the first three years after the tillage change. Therefore, the mixed results observed in the past were probably due to comparing tillage effects starting from different land usage history i.e., short-term changes (less than 3 years) with longer term practices. Our data supports little long-term impact of tillage on soybean cyst nematode reproduction.

Technical Abstract: Soybean cyst nematode, Heterodera glycines has been documented as the pathogen most consistently causing yield loss in US soybean production fields almost since its discovery in the US. No-tillage has been adopted in much of the soybean production areas to preserve soil and nutrients. The impact of this production practice change on soybean cyst nematode has been evaluated since the introduction of the practice over thirty years ago and mixed results on the impact have been recorded. This study was initiated to determine if tillage practices and timing of changes impacted soybean cyst nematode reproduction. The study was imposed on a long-term tillage study and treatments were changed to measure short-term as well as long-term effects of tillage on soybean cyst nematode. Significant differences in soybean cyst nematode population density were found between treatments. However, significant differences found could be attributed to short-term changes in tilled and no-tilled treatments. Soybean cyst nematode reproduction was almost twice as high in treatments which changed from no-tillage to disc than tilled treatments changed to no-tillage. No significant differences were found in yield among the treatments. Grain yield was reflective of cultivar grown and environmental conditions.

Last Modified: 12/18/2014
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