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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SALINITY AND TRACE ELEMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH WATER REUSE IN IRRIGATED SYSTEMS: PROCESSES, SAMPLING PROTOCOLS, AND SITE-SPECIFIC MANAGEMENT Title: Use of saline and recycled water as an alternative irrigation water supply: Chemical and agronomic considerations

Authors
item Suarez, Donald
item Suarez, Donald

Submitted to: American Chemical Society Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 2, 2007
Publication Date: March 20, 2007
Citation: Suarez, D.L. 2007. Use of saline and recycled water as an alternative irrigation water supply: Chemical and agronomic considerations. American Chemical Society Abstracts. 233rd National Meeting held in Chicago, IL. March 25-29, 2007. Paper No. SUST 94.

Technical Abstract: Predictions of increased occurrences of drought in the SW U.S. coupled with increasing urban demands for fresh water have resulted in projections of decreased irrigated acreage. However, agriculture can utilize saline, drainage and treated municipal and industrial waste waters for irrigation of many crops, thereby relieving demands on fresh water supplies and maintaining production. These saline waters generally contain increased levels of Na, Cl, alkalinity (thus elevated pH) and minor elements such as B that may adversely affect crop growth. Infiltration problems and loss of soil structure can be controlled by use of amendments and alternative management practices when sodic waters are used. As demonstrated by examples, proper crop selection and management practices will enable beneficial use of these waters with minimal reduction in yield of many crops. Examples are given of plants that adapt to salt stress by enhanced accumulation of secondary metabolites thus increasing quality and marketability.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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