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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION AND ENHANCEMENT OF NATURAL ENEMIES Title: Observations of stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) ovipositing and feeding on peanuts

Author
item Tillman, Patricia

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 16, 2008
Publication Date: October 1, 2008
Citation: Tillman, P.G. 2008. Observations of stink bugs (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) ovipositing and feeding on peanuts. Journal of Entomological Science. 43(4):447-452.

Interpretive Summary: Stink bugs have increased in importance as pests of cotton over the past several years, but there is no information available on feeding behavior of these pests in peanuts which are generally planted in close association with cotton. The objective of this study was to determine if and where two major stink bug pests, the Southern green stink bug and the brown stink bug, lay eggs and feed on peanuts. It was determined that females of both pests laid eggs on leaflets of the peanut plant, and every immature stage and adults fed on all parts of this plant. This information helps in understanding the role of peanuts in the ecology of these stink bugs which in turn helps in better understanding how to manage their populations in landscapes in which peanuts are associated with other cotton or other crops.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine if and where two major species of phytophagous stink bugs, Nezara viridula (L.) and Euschistus servus (Say) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), oviposit and feed on peanuts. Adult females of N. viridula and E. servus oviposit on leaflets of this plant. For both stink bug species, every developmental stage from 2nd instars through adults fed on all parts of the peanut plant, leaflets, mid-veins of leaflets, petioles of leaflets, and stems of peanuts, with the exception of 2nd instars which were not provided stems. The two stink bug species fed equally on the same plant parts throughout their development. The 2nd instars preferred to feed on the petioles. The 3rd, 4th, and 5th instars and adults preferred to feed on the stems. Because both N. viridula and E. servus oviposit and feed on peanuts, the role of peanuts in the ecology of these stink bugs needs to be ascertained to better understand how to manage their populations in landscapes in which peanuts are associated with other crops.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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