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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS FOR INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION AND ENHANCEMENT OF NATURAL ENEMIES

Location: Crop Protection and Management Research

Title: Laboratory effects of two organically-certified insecticides on Trichopoda pennipes (Diptera:Tachinidae)

Author
item Tillman, Patricia

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 18, 2008
Publication Date: October 1, 2008
Citation: Tillman, P.G. 2008. Laboratory effects of two organically-certified insecticides on Trichopoda pennipes (Diptera:Tachinidae). Journal of Entomological Science. 43(4): 408-417.

Interpretive Summary: Neem and Tracer are two of the few insecticides currently certified for suppression of insect pests in organic crops. With the increase in organic production of agricultural crops, it is vital to understand the impact that Neem and Tracer have on the survival of natural enemies. The objective of this laboratory study was to determine the impact of these two insecticides on the stink bug natural enemy, the red-winged fly, when walking on, being sprayed with, and feeding on the insecticides. The insecticide Karate was used as a conventional crop production standard for control of lepidopterous pests. Neem was the only insecticide in which adults of the red-winged fly survived in each of the experiments. Tracer was as highly toxic to this natural enemy as Karate. These results suggest that Neem would probably be safer to the red-winged fly than Tracer in organically grown crops.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this laboratory study was to determine the effects of two organically-certified insecticides, azadirachtin and spinosad, on the stink bug parasitoid Trichopoda pennipes (Fab.) (Diptera: Tachinidae) in residual, topical, and oral toxicity tests. The insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin was used as a conventional crop production standard for control of lepidopterous pests. Azadirachtin was the only insecticide in which T. pennipes adults survived after exposure to dried residues, topical applications, and insecticide-treated food. Spinosad was as highly toxic to this parasitoid as lambda-cyhalothrin in all three tests even though spinosad was slower acting than lambda-cyhalothrin. These results suggest that azadirachtin would probably be safer to T. pennipes than spinosad in organically grown crops.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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