Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ORIGIN, DEVELOPMENT AND POPULATION GENETICS OF STABLE FLIES AFFECTING PASTURED AND CONFINED LIVESTOCK

Location: Agroecosystem Management Research

Title: Emergence of Stable Flies From Winter Cattle Feeding Sites During the Spring and Summer

Authors
item Berkebile, Dennis
item Taylor, David

Submitted to: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: December 3, 2007
Publication Date: December 11, 2007
Citation: Berkebile, D.R., Taylor, D.B. 2007. Emergence of Stable Flies From Winter Cattle Feeding Sites During the Spring and Summer [poster]. Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, December 9-12, 2007, San Diego, California. Available [to members only ]: http://esa.confex.com/recording/esa/2007/pdf/654/1d2ea2e95eb03bf6ca6dc974df1ed442/paper30640_1.pdf

Interpretive Summary: The stable fly has become a serious pest of pasture cattle with the practice of feeding large round bales of hay during the winter. Manure and waste hay accumulate at these feeding sites and produce a habitat conducive to immature stable fly development. Adult stable fly emergence was monitored at five feeding sites over three fly seasons with emergence traps. At the base of each trap, a metal barrier was inserted into the waste hay to restrict the movement of stable fly larvae into the sample plots. Stable flies begin laying eggs at these sites in April, soon after the first adult flies are observed in the spring. Adult stable flies begin to emerge in May. The number of stable flies emerging from this material varies between years and between sites. Numbers produced may be dependent upon the length of time cattle are fed at the location, the proximity of the site to cattle later in the season, and the type of hay fed to the cattle. Few stable flies are produced by these sites after the first of July. It takes over 50 days for the first oviposited eggs at these sites to develop to the adult stage. As temperatures increased, developmental time decreased to less than 2 weeks. An increase in developmental time was observed in July at 4 of the 5 sample sites, a possible response to the changing habitat.

Technical Abstract: The stable fly has become a serious pest of pasture cattle with the practice of feeding large round bales of hay during the winter. Manure and waste hay accumulate at these feeding sites and produce a habitat conducive to immature stable fly development. Adult stable fly emergence was monitored at five feeding sites over three fly seasons with emergence traps. At the base of each trap, a metal barrier was inserted into the waste hay to restrict the movement of stable fly larvae into the sample plots. Stable flies begin laying eggs at these sites in April, soon after the first adult flies are observed in the spring. Adult stable flies begin to emerge in May. The number of stable flies emerging from this material varies between years and between sites. Numbers produced may be dependent upon the length of time cattle are fed at the location, the proximity of the site to cattle later in the season, and the type of hay fed to the cattle. Few stable flies are produced by these sites after the first of July. It takes over 50 days for the first oviposited eggs at these sites to develop to the adult stage. As temperatures increased, developmental time decreased to less than 2 weeks. An increase in developmental time was observed in July at 4 of the 5 sample sites, a possible response to the changing habitat.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014