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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ORIGIN, DEVELOPMENT AND POPULATION GENETICS OF STABLE FLIES AFFECTING PASTURED AND CONFINED LIVESTOCK Title: Spatial Dynamics of a Stable Fly (Stomoxys calcitrans) Population in Eastern Nebraska

Authors
item Taylor, David
item Berkebile, Dennis

Submitted to: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: December 3, 2007
Publication Date: December 11, 2007
Citation: Taylor, D.B., Berkebile, D.R. 2007. Spatial Dynamics of a Stable Fly (Stomoxys calcitrans) Population in Eastern Nebraska [poster]. Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting. December 9-12, 2007. San Diego, California.

Technical Abstract: The spatial distribution of adult stable flies on a 4,000 hectare research station in Eastern Nebraska was studied. The station includes a 2,000 head capacity feedlot, a 250 cow dairy and 1,500 hectares of pasture with 500 cattle. Most of the remainder of the property is used for row crops. A 30,000 head feedlot is located on the northern boundary of the station. No spatial structure was observed in stable fly trap collections. The variance between traps was not correlated with the distance between those traps. Although trap collections were highest adjacent to the two feedlots, traps only slightly removed from the feedlots often collected relatively few flies. Correlation of temporal collection levels between traps was related to the distance between those traps. Overall, collections were not significantly correlated with distance from either of the two beef cattle feedlots or the dairy. Cross-correlation plots indicated that collections were negatively correlated with distance from the above sites during the peak season. Variation in both overall amplitude and seasonal distribution of stable fly populations as measured by Alsynite adhesive traps indicates that multiple traps dispersed across the area of interest will be needed to accurately assess stable fly populations as individual traps can miss population changes as close as one km away.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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