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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of ‘CP 88-1165’ Sugarcane

Authors
item Juarez, Jorge - MAGDALENA SUGAR MILL
item Miller, Jimmy
item Orozco, Hector - CENGICANA
item Solares, Edgar - MAGDALENA SUGAR MILL
item Tai, Peter
item Comstock, Jack
item Glaz, Barry
item Queme DE Leon, Jose - CENGICANA
item Ovalle, Werner - CENGICANA
item Edme, Serge
item Glynn, Neil
item Deren, Christopher - UNIVERSITY OF ARKINSAS

Submitted to: Journal of Plant Registrations
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 28, 2008
Publication Date: May 29, 2008
Citation: Juarez, J., Miller, J.D., Orozco, H., Solares, E., Tai, P.Y.P., Comstock, J.C., Glaz, B.S., Queme De Leon, J., Ovalle, W., Edme, S.J., Glynn, N.C., Deren, C.Registration of ‘CP 88-1165’ Sugarcane. Journal of Plant Registrations. 2:102-109. 2008.

Interpretive Summary: Sugarcane is grown intensely in a region near Lake Okeechobee in south Florida. This region contributes about 25% of U.S. domestic sugar production. A cooperative program among the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS), the University of Florida, and the Florida Sugar Cane League, Inc. located at an ARS facility in Canal Point, FL (CP program) develops new sugarcane cultivars for this region. During the past 25 years, several successful cultivars in Florida developed by the CP program have also been widely planted in Guatemala. A new cultivar in Guatemala, CP 88-1165, is the first cultivar developed by the CP program that is used commercially in Guatemala but not in Florida. In tests conducted in Guatemala, the three-crop mean cane yield of CP 88-1165 was higher than that of CP 72-2086. CP 72-2086 was the reference cultivar against which yields of CP 88-1165 were compared. CP 72-2086 is the most widely planted sugarcane cultivar in Guatemala and was used extensively in Florida until it became susceptible to sugarcane mosaic. The three-year mean sugar content of CP 88-1165 was lower than that of CP 72-2086. However, due to its high cane yields, the three-year mean sugar per hectare yield was higher for CP 88-1165 than for CP 72-2086. Cultivar resistance and tolerance are the major sources of sugarcane disease control in Florida and Guatemala, but they are challenging to identify and quantify, because plants are growing and therefore exposed to disease pressures all year. CP 88-1165 has shown adequate resistance for commercial production in Guatemala to smut, leaf scald, brown rust, sugarcane mosaic virus, and ratoon stunting. CP 88-1165 is susceptible to sugarcane yellow leaf virus, but its high yields in experimental plots were obtained regardless of this susceptibility. CP 88-1165 was not released commercially in Florida due to its low sugar content and its susceptibility to brown rust in Florida. The commercial release of CP 88-1165 in Guatemala makes available to farmers there a sugarcane cultivar that maintains high yields in the presence of diseases. Additionally, CP 88-1165 may be tested by sugarcane farmers in other countries of Central America, who grow mostly cultivars developed by the CP program. In cooperation with the CP program, CP 88-1165 was tested in Guatemala by the Centro Guatemalteco de Investigación y Capacitación de la Caña de Azucar (CENGICAÑA) and was released in Guatemala in September 2004.

Technical Abstract: Sugarcane grown in a concentrated region near Lake Okeechobee in Florida produces 25% of the sugar produced in the U.S. A cooperative program among the USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS), the University of Florida, and the Florida Sugar Cane League, Inc. located at an ARS facility in Canal Point, FL (CP program) develops new sugarcane cultivars for this region. During the past 25 years, several successful cultivars in Florida developed by the CP program have also been widely planted in Guatemala. The purpose of this report was to report on yields and disease resistance of a new sugarcane cultivar, CP 88-1165, that is the first cultivar produced by the CP program to be widely used in Guatemala but not in Florida. CP 88-1165 was selected among the progeny of cross ‘CL 61-620’ X CP 81-1302 made at Canal Point, FL in January 1986. CL 61-620 was a commercial cultivar in Florida developed by a now discontinued private breeding program that was based in Clewiston, FL. CP 81-1302 was tested in advanced stages in Florida but did not have high enough yields to be released. In cooperation with the CP program, CP 88-1165 was tested in Guatemala by the Centro Guatemalteco de Investigación y Capacitación de la Caña de Azucar (CENGICAÑA) and was released in Guatemala in September 2004. In experiments in Guatemala, yields of CP 88-1165 were compared with yields of sugarcane cultivar CP 72-2086 in the low- and middle-altitude zones of Guatemala’s sugarcane growing region. The mean stalk weights of CP 88-1165 and CP 72-2086 were 1.1 and 1.0 kg, respectively in the low-altitude zone; and the stalk weights of CP 88-1165 and CP 72-2086 were 0.9 and 0.8 kg, respectively in the middle-altitude zone. Yields of theoretical recoverable sucrose (TRS) in the low-altitude zone for CP 88-1165 and CP 72-2086 were 158.8 and 167.5 g sucrose per kg cane, respectively. Cane yields in the low-altitude zone for CP 88-1165 and CP 72-2086 were 178.9 and 142.6 tons per ha, respectively; and sucrose yields in the low-altitude zone were 28.3 and 23.7 kg per ha, respectively. In the middle-altitude zone, TRS yields for CP 88-1165 and CP 72-2086 were 162.0 and 169.9 g per kg, respectively. Cane yields in the middle-altitude zone for CP 88-1165 and CP 72-2086 were 132.9 and 114.7 tons per ha, respectively; and sucrose yields in the middle altitude zone were 21.4 and 19.4 tons per ha, respectively. CP 88-1165 has shown adequate resistance to all other major diseases in Guatemala and Florida except sugarcane yellow leaf virus in both regions and brown rust in Florida. Based on its high sugar and tonnage yields in the presence of diseases prevalent in Guatemala, CP 88-1165 may make a substantial commercial contribution to sugarcane production in Guatemala.

Last Modified: 4/17/2014
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