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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS OF APHIDS, MITES, SCALES, THRIPS, AND TERMITES WITH EMPHASIS ON INVASIVE SPECIES Title: Records of Hemiptera (Sternorrhyncha, Cicadomorpha, Heteroptera) New to Newfoundland, Canada

Authors
item Wheeler, A. - DEPT. OF ENT.CLEMSON UNIV
item Hoebeke, Richard - DEPT. OF ENT.CORNELL UNIV
item Miller, Gary

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 1, 2008
Publication Date: November 20, 2008
Citation: Wheeler, A.G., Hoebeke, R., Miller, G.L. 2008. Records of Hemiptera (Sternorrhyncha, Cicadomorpha, Heteroptera) New to Newfoundland, Canada. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. 110(4):1244-1250.

Interpretive Summary: The Hemiptera are pests that predominantly feed on many of the world’s agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants. In addition to direct feeding damage, some groups(e.g., aphids)are important in the role of transmission of plant diseases. This group warrants additional concern when species are considered invasive or adventive. This paper identifies 10 adventive hemipteran species not previously recorded from Newfoundland. A summary of the previously recorded North American distribution and host-plant associations of all 12 species is provided. This paper will be of special interest to quarantine personnel at both the federal and state levels.

Technical Abstract: The first Newfoundland records are given for 10 Palearctic hemipteran species: five aphids, two leafhoppers, two anthocorids, and a microphysid. Of the 5 aphid species, two (Acyrthosiphum pisum (Harris) and Hyperomyzus lectucae (L.)) are considered cosmopolitan but have previously been overlooked. These records underscore their widespread distribution. Two mirid species native to North America also are reported as new to the island. All 12 species were collected in St. John’s (and some at other locales on the eastern Avalon Peninsula). The record of the mirid Deraeocoris piceicola Knight is the first for eastern Canada, and that of the microphysid Loricula pselaphiformis Curtis is the second for North America, this species previously having been known only from Halifax, Nova Scotia. A summary of the previously recorded North American distribution and host-plant associations of all 12 species is provided. This paper will be of special interest to quarantine personnel at both the federal, state, and international levels.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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