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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Grafting effects on vegetable quality

Authors
item Davis, Angela
item Perkins Veazie, Penelope
item Hassell, Richard - CLEMSON UNIV.
item Levi, Amnon
item King, Stephen - TEXAS A&M UNIV.
item Zhang, Xingping - SYGENTA SEEDS

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 29, 2008
Publication Date: September 15, 2008
Citation: Davis, A.R., Perkins Veazie, P.M., Hassell, R., Levi, A., King, S.R., Zhang, X. 2008. Grafting effects on vegetable quality. HortScience. 43(6):1670-1672.

Interpretive Summary: Vegetable grafting began in the 1920s to control soil-borne disease. It is now a common practice in Asia, parts of Europe, and the Middle East. In Japan and Korea most cucumber, watermelon, cantaloupe, and tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) grown are from grafted plants. This practice is rare in the U.S. and there have been few experiments to determine optimal grafting production practices for different geographical and climatic regions in America. This is beginning to change due to the phase-out of methyl bromide. The U.S. vegetable industries are looking at grafting as a viable option for disease control. Since reports indicate the type of rootstock alters the resulting yield and quality attributes of the fruit, some seed companies are looking into grafting for improving quality. It has been reported that pH, flavor, sugar, color, nutritional content, and texture can be affected by grafting and the type of rootstock used. Reports vary on whether the grafting effects are advantageous or deleterious, but it is usually agreed that the rootstock/scion combination must be carefully chosen for optimal fruit quality. It is important to study rootstock/scion combinations under multiple climatic and geographic conditions.

Technical Abstract: Vegetable grafting began in the 1920s to control soil-borne disease. It is now a common practice in Asia, parts of Europe, and the Middle East. In Japan and Korea most of the cucurbits and tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) grown are grafted. This practice is rare in the U.S. and there have been few experiments to determine optimal grafting production practices for different geographical and climatic regions in America. This is beginning to change due to the phase-out of methyl bromide. The U.S. cucurbit and tomato industries are looking at grafting as a viable option for disease control. Since reports indicate the type of rootstock alters yield and quality attributes of the scion fruit, some seed companies are looking into grafting for improving quality. It has been reported that pH, flavor, sugar, color, carotenoid content, and texture can be affected by grafting and the type of rootstock used. Reports vary on whether grafting effects are advantageous or deleterious, but it is usually agreed that the rootstock/scion combination must be carefully chosen for optimal fruit quality. It is important to study rootstock/scion combinations under multiple climatic and geographic conditions.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014