Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CONTROL OF ARTHROPOD PESTS OF PECAN AND PEACH

Location: Fruit and Nut Research

Title: Naturally-occurring pathogens and invasive insects

Authors
item Cottrell, Ted
item Shapiro Ilan, David

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: November 6, 2007
Publication Date: November 5, 2008
Citation: Cottrell, T.E., Shapiro Ilan, D.I. 2008. Naturally-occurring pathogens and invasive insects. In: Hajek, A.E., et al., editors. Use of Microbes for Control and Eradication of Invasive Arthropods. New York, NY:Springer. p. 19-32.

Interpretive Summary: The successful establishment of introduced pest insects has been attributed, in part, to the pest insects’ separation from natural control agents in their native ranges. This concept, i.e., the ‘enemies release hypothesis’, is commonly referenced in the literature as a mechanism that fosters invasive species. For example, in a study of invasive plant species, each invasive species was infected by 77% fewer fungal and viral pathogen species in naturalized versus native ranges. Based on examples such as these, one might extend the argument to pathogen load in invasive insects, i.e., one would predict a low prevalence of disease in invasive arthropods. And indeed this is the case for certain invasive arthropods as we illustrate. In this chapter we focus on the role of endemic pathogens in establishment and population regulation of exotic arthropods.

Technical Abstract: The successful establishment of introduced pest insects has been attributed, in part, to the pest insects’ separation from natural control agents in their native ranges. This concept, i.e., the ‘enemies release hypothesis’, is commonly referenced in the literature as a mechanism that fosters invasive species. For example, in a study of invasive plant species, each invasive species was infected by 77% fewer fungal and viral pathogen species in naturalized versus native ranges. Based on examples such as these, one might extend the argument to pathogen load in invasive insects, i.e., one would predict a low prevalence of disease in invasive arthropods. And indeed this is the case for certain invasive arthropods as we illustrate. In this chapter we focus on the role of endemic pathogens in establishment and population regulation of exotic arthropods.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014